Difference: RunStatsPublicResults2009 (18 vs. 19)

Revision 192010-05-07 - BeateHeinemann

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META TOPICPARENT name="AtlasResults"
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 Approved plots that can be shown by ATLAS speakers at conferences and similar events.
Please do not add figures on your own. Contact the Data Preparation Coordinators in case of questions and/or suggestions.
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Luminosity

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Overall Data Taking Statistics

 
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Instantaneous luminosity determined by two independent methods for run 142193, taken by ATLAS on Dec 12, 2009. This run offered an extended stable-beam period of 4.5 hours, thus allowing ATLAS to measure the instantaneous luminosity for varying beam intensities.
The blue open circles show the instantaneous luminosity as determined by the LAr and the red stars show the instantaneous luminosity as measured by the MBTS. The instantaneous luminosity is corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system, and therefore is an estimate of the LHC delivered luminosity at the ATLAS interaction point. For these measurements the PYHTIA Monte Carlo simulation of the pp inelastic processes have been used. The corresponding cross section used to normalize the measurements is 52.5 mb including non-diffractive, single-diffractive, and double-diffractive processes. The systematic uncertainty on the model is estimated using PHOJET. The difference between the two models translates into a variation of the luminosity of 18% for LAr and 15% for the MBTS. This uncertainty is 100% correlated between the two methods and dominates the total uncertainty on the measurements. The two curves show only the statistical error as the systematic uncertainty is time independent. For this run the estimated delivered luminosity is 3.0± 0.6μb−1:
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Luminosity

Comparison of Measurements between MBTS, LUCID and the LAr Calorimeter

Instantaneous luminosity determined by two independent methods for run 142193, taken by ATLAS on Dec 12, 2009. This run offered an extended stable-beam period of 4.5 hours, thus allowing ATLAS to measure the instantaneous luminosity for varying beam intensities.
The blue open circles show the instantaneous luminosity as determined by the LAr and the red triangles show the instantaneous luminosity as measured by the MBTS. The instantaneous luminosity is corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system, and therefore is an estimate of the LHC delivered luminosity at the ATLAS interaction point. For these measurements the PYHTIA Monte Carlo simulation of the pp inelastic processes have been used. The corresponding cross section used to normalize the measurements is 52.5 mb including non-diffractive, single-diffractive, and double-diffractive processes. The systematic uncertainty on the model is estimated using PHOJET. The difference between the two models translates into a variation of the luminosity of 18% for LAr and 15% for the MBTS. This uncertainty is 100% correlated between the two methods and dominates the total uncertainty on the measurements. The two curves show only the statistical error as the systematic uncertainty is time independent. For this run the estimated delivered luminosity is 3.0± 0.6μb−1:
 
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run142193_absolute_luminosity.png
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run142193_absolute_luminosity.pngEPS version
Instantaneous luminosity determined by four independent methods for run 142193, taken by ATLAS on Dec 12, 2009. This run offered an extended stable-beam period of 4.5 hours, thus allowing ATLAS to measure the instantaneous luminosity for varying beam intensities.
The plot shows the performance of the LAr, LUCID zero counting AND, and the HLT vertex counting normalized to give the same integrated luminosity as the MBTS results. The MBTS (shaded area) result provides the ATLAS luminosity. It is corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system, and is therefore an estimate of the LHC delivered luminosity at the ATLAS interaction The corresponding cross section used to normalize the measurements is 52.5 mb includes non-diffractive, single-diffractive, and double-diffractive. The systematic uncertainty in the model is estimated using PHOJET. The difference between the two models translates into a variation of the luminosity of 15%. For this run the estimated delivered luminosity is, 3.0± 0.6μb−1: the uncertainty is dominated by the systematic on the physics model. The LUCID zero counting AND is not corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system since the LUCID detector is not exposed to this effect. The four curves show only the statistical error as the systematic uncertainties are time independent and largely correlated among the different methods.
run142193_relative_luminosity.png EPS version
 
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Specific luminosity as function of the local (Geneva) time for three selected LHC fills. The specific luminosities for fills 911 and 919 (both taken at 900 GeV centre-of-mass energy) are comparable and stable versus time. The specific luminosity for fill 923 is higher, as expected due to the beams being more focussed at the higher energy. During fill 923 the specific luminosity suddenly descreased at 3:00, and then returned to the previous level at 3:45. This is correlated with the beams being separated horizontally as is seen in the lower figure. The errors shown are purely statistical.

The luminosity was measured using the forward Liquid-Argon calorimeters. The acceptance of the selection was taken from pythia as described above. The specific luminosity is given by the instantaneous luminosity divided by the number of protons per bunch in each of the beams and the number of colliding bunches. The number of protons per beam is taken from TIMBER.

eps files are also available for the spec. luminosity for fill 911, fill 919, fill 923 and for the IP separation plot

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Instantaneous luminosity determined by four independent methods for run 142193, taken by ATLAS on Dec 12, 2009. This run offered an extended stable-beam period of 4.5 hours, thus allowing ATLAS to measure the instantaneous luminosity for varying beam intensities.
The plot shows the performance of the LAr, LUCID zero counting AND, and the HLT vertex counting methods. The LUCID and the HLT are normalized to give the same integrated luminosity as the MBTS results, while the LAr is normalized using its own visible cross section. The MBTS (shaded area) result provides the ATLAS luminosity. It is corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system, and is therefore an estimate of the LHC delivered luminosity at the ATLAS interaction The lower luminosity bin around 14:30 UTC includes a period of time where ATLAS was 100% busy and therefore it is not possible to derive a deadtime correction. The LUCID zero counting AND is not corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system since the LUCID detector is not exposed to this effect. For this reason LUCID does not show the deep at around 14:30 UTC. The corresponding cross section used to normalize the measurements is 52.5 mb includes non-diffractive, single-diffractive, and double-diffractive. The systematic uncertainty in the model is estimated using PHOJET. The difference between the two models translates into a variation of the luminosity of 15%. For this run the estimated delivered luminosity is 3.0± 0.6μb−1: , the uncertainty is dominated by the systematic on the physics model. The four curves show only the statistical error as the systematic uncertainties are time independent and largely correlated among the different methods.
 
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http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/atlas_specLuminosity_run142193_2009.png
http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/atlas_specLuminosity_run142383_2009.png
http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/atlas_specLuminosity_run142402_2009.png
http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/IPpositions_B1B2_16Dec09.png
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run142193_relative_luminosity_larAbsolute.pngEPS version
The plot shows the performance of the LAr, LUCID hit counting OR, LUCID zero counting AND, and the HLT vertex counting with respect to the MBTS. The different models are normalized to give the same integrated luminosity as the MBTS results. The four curves show only the statistical error as as the systematic uncertainties are time independent and largely correlated among the different methods.
run142193_relative_luminosity_ratio.png EPS version
Comparison of the luminosity from the LAr and LUCID zero counting AND method with respect to the MBTS during a time period affected by data acquisition dead time. The curves are not corrected for dead time. The LAr and LUCID curves are normalized to give the same integrated luminosity in a time period where the data acquisition was not affected by dead time. This plot shows that only LUCID is not affected by the data acquisition dead time (UCT 14:20). In particular around 14:16 it is visible a very short ( 14 s) time period where ATLAS was suffering 100% dead time while LUCID was recording luminosity. This is because the LUCID detector readout is decoupled from the ATLAS data acquisition system.
run142193_relative_luminosity_noDeadtime.png EPS version
 
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Systematic uncertainties of the two methods currently used for the luminosity measurements. The correlation coeffcient is 100%. Note, that the total systematic error is not the quadratic sum of the individual ones in all cases since part of the detector response is correlated to the uncertainty on the accceptance.
systematic_table.png EPS version

Measurement of the Event Rate Luminosity using a Track Based Method

The primary purpose of the track based luminosity measurement is to facilitate a model- and detector-independent comparison of the luminosity with the other LHC experiments.

Rate of events in LHC Fill 911 with at least one charged primary particle (pT >0.5 GeV/c, |η|<0.8) versus UTC time (solid markers). Also shown is the raw rate of events with at least one track in this acceptance range (dashed line). The correction factor applied to the raw rate to obtain the charged particle rate is 1.08 +/- 0.02. It corrects for any experimental efficiencies, e.g. due to the tracking, vertexing and trigger efficiencies.
https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/TrackRate.142193.png
eps file
Cross sections and acceptances of the requirement of have at least one charged primary particle with |η|<0.8 and pT >0.5 GeV/c for two Pythia Monte Carlo tunes, for Pythia 8 and for Phojet for √s=900 GeV. The statistical uncertainties on the numbers given are less than 0.1\%.
https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/acceptance_trklumi.png
The assumed cross section model, the acceptance model, the visible cross section (σvis) and the ratio of the visible to the total inelastic cross section is given where σinelNDSDDD for √s=900 GeV.
https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/sigmavis_trklumi.png
Instantaneous Luminosity for LHC fill 911 vs UTC time comparing three methods of luminosity determination. The "Track" based method (solid circles) measures the luminosity by counting primary charged particles with pT > 0.5 GeV/c and |η|<0.8. The "MBTS" method (open circles) counts events that have energy deposits on both sides of the interaction point in the MBTS scintillators in the range 2.09<|η|<3.84 that are consistent in timing with a collision event. The "LAr Timing" method (open circles) counts events that have energy deposits on both sides of the interaction point in the LAr calorimeter in the range 2.5<|η|<4.5 that are consistent in timing with a collision event. For all methods the visible cross section is determined using Pythia MC09 for the model of inelastic collisions. The Track based method gives an 3% larger luminosity than the MBTS method and a 7% larger luminosity than the LAr method. The MBTS (LAr) method has a systematic uncertainty of 4% (5%) that is uncorrelated with the Track method, while the uncorrelated systematic uncertainty of the Track Counting method is 2%.
https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/TrackLumivsMBTSLArLumi.142193.png
eps file
The instantaneous luminosity for LHC Fill 911 as a function of UTC time. The luminosity is shown assuming the Pythia (black solid markers) vs the Phojet (blue histogram) model for the acceptances and the cross sections.
https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/TrackLumi.PythiavsPhojet.142193.png
eps file

Detailed Information about the MBTS Measurement

 
MBTS A-C side time difference Deltat(A-C) for events triggered by the L1_MBTS_1_1_Col for the ATLAS run 141994. The circles (black) correspond to events selected with L1_MBTS_1_1_Col, the shaded (yellow) area defines the events
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 EPS version
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Instantaneous luminosity determined by two independent methods for run 142193, taken by ATLAS on Dec 12, 2009. This run offered an extended stable-beam period of 4.5 hours, thus allowing ATLAS to measure the instantaneous luminosity for varying beam intensities.
The blue open circles show the instantaneous luminosity as determined by the LAr and the red triangles show the instantaneous luminosity as measured by the MBTS. The instantaneous luminosity is corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system, and therefore is an estimate of the LHC delivered luminosity at the ATLAS interaction point. For these measurements the PYHTIA Monte Carlo simulation of the pp inelastic processes have been used. The corresponding cross section used to normalize the measurements is 52.5 mb including non-diffractive, single-diffractive, and double-diffractive processes. The systematic uncertainty on the model is estimated using PHOJET. The difference between the two models translates into a variation of the luminosity of 18% for LAr and 15% for the MBTS. This uncertainty is 100% correlated between the two methods and dominates the total uncertainty on the measurements. The two curves show only the statistical error as the systematic uncertainty is time independent. For this run the estimated delivered luminosity is 3.0± 0.6μb−1:
run142193_absolute_luminosity.png EPS version
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Specific Luminosity Measurements

 
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Instantaneous luminosity determined by four independent methods for run 142193, taken by ATLAS on Dec 12, 2009. This run offered an extended stable-beam period of 4.5 hours, thus allowing ATLAS to measure the instantaneous luminosity for varying beam intensities.
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Specific luminosity as function of the local (Geneva) time for three selected LHC fills. The specific luminosities for fills 911 and 919 (both taken at 900 GeV centre-of-mass energy) are comparable and stable versus time. The specific luminosity for fill 923 is higher, as expected due to the beams being more focussed at the higher energy. During fill 923 the specific luminosity suddenly descreased at 3:00, and then returned to the previous level at 3:45. This is correlated with the beams being separated horizontally as is seen in the lower figure. The errors shown are purely statistical.
 
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The plot shows the performance of the LAr, LUCID zero counting AND, and the HLT vertex counting normalized to give the same integrated luminosity as the MBTS results. The MBTS (shaded area) result provides the ATLAS luminosity. It is corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system, and is therefore an estimate of the LHC delivered luminosity at the ATLAS interaction The corresponding cross section used to normalize the measurements is 52.5 mb includes non-diffractive, single-diffractive, and double-diffractive. The systematic uncertainty in the model is estimated using PHOJET. The difference between the two models translates into a variation of the luminosity of 15%. For this run the estimated delivered luminosity is, 3.0± 0.6μb−1: the uncertainty is dominated by the systematic on the physics model. The LUCID zero counting AND is not corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system since the LUCID detector is not exposed to this effect. The four curves show only the statistical error as the systematic uncertainties are time independent and largely correlated among the different methods.
run142193_relative_luminosity.png EPS version
Instantaneous luminosity determined by four independent methods for run 142193, taken by ATLAS on Dec 12, 2009. This run offered an extended stable-beam period of 4.5 hours, thus allowing ATLAS to measure the instantaneous luminosity for varying beam intensities.
>
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The luminosity was measured using the forward Liquid-Argon calorimeters. The acceptance of the selection was taken from pythia as described above. The specific luminosity is given by the instantaneous luminosity divided by the number of protons per bunch in each of the beams and the number of colliding bunches. The number of protons per beam is taken from TIMBER.

eps files are also available for the spec. luminosity for fill 911, fill 919, fill 923 and for the IP separation plot

 
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The plot shows the performance of the LAr, LUCID zero counting AND, and the HLT vertex counting methods. The LUCID and the HLT are normalized to give the same integrated luminosity as the MBTS results, while the LAr is normalized using its own visible cross section. The MBTS (shaded area) result provides the ATLAS luminosity. It is corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system, and is therefore an estimate of the LHC delivered luminosity at the ATLAS interaction The lower luminosity bin around 14:30 UTC includes a period of time where ATLAS was 100% busy and therefore it is not possible to derive a deadtime correction. The LUCID zero counting AND is not corrected for the dead time in the data acquisition system since the LUCID detector is not exposed to this effect. For this reason LUCID does not show the deep at around 14:30 UTC. The corresponding cross section used to normalize the measurements is 52.5 mb includes non-diffractive, single-diffractive, and double-diffractive. The systematic uncertainty in the model is estimated using PHOJET. The difference between the two models translates into a variation of the luminosity of 15%. For this run the estimated delivered luminosity is 3.0± 0.6μb−1: , the uncertainty is dominated by the systematic on the physics model. The four curves show only the statistical error as the systematic uncertainties are time independent and largely correlated among the different methods.
run142193_relative_luminosity_larAbsolute.png EPS version
The plot shows the performance of the LAr, LUCID hit counting OR, LUCID zero counting AND, and the HLT vertex counting with respect to the MBTS. The different models are normalized to give the same integrated luminosity as the MBTS results. The four curves show only the statistical error as as the systematic uncertainties are time independent and largely correlated among the different methods.
run142193_relative_luminosity_ratio.png EPS version
Comparison of the luminosity from the LAr and LUCID zero counting AND method with respect to the MBTS during a time period affected by data acquisition dead time. The curves are not corrected for dead time. The LAr and LUCID curves are normalized to give the same integrated luminosity in a time period where the data acquisition was not affected by dead time. This plot shows that only LUCID is not affected by the data acquisition dead time (UCT 14:20). In particular around 14:16 it is visible a very short ( 14 s) time period where ATLAS was suffering 100% dead time while LUCID was recording luminosity. This is because the LUCID detector readout is decoupled from the ATLAS data acquisition system.
run142193_relative_luminosity_noDeadtime.png EPS version
Systematic uncertainties of the two methods currently used for the luminosity measurements. The correlation coeffcient is 100%. Note, that the total systematic error is not the quadratic sum of the individual ones in all cases since part of the detector response is correlated to the uncertainty on the accceptance.
 
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systematic_table.pngEPS version
Comparison of Instantaneous Luminosity Measurement using Three Different Methods
Instantaneous Luminosity for LHC fill 911 vs UTC time comparing three methods of luminosity determination. The "Track" based method (solid circles) measures the luminosity by counting primary charged particles with pT > 0.5 GeV/c and |eta|<0.8. The "MBTS" method (open circles) counts events that have energy deposits on both sides of the interaction point in the MBTS scintillators in the range 2.08<|eta|<3.84 that are consistent in timing with a collision event. The "LAr Timing" method (open circles) counts events that have energy deposits on both sides of the interaction point in the LAr calorimeter in the range 2.5<|\eta|<4.5 that are consistent in timing with a collision event. For all methods the visible cross section is determined using Pythia MC09 for the model of inelastic collisions. The Track based method gives an 3% larger luminosity than the MBTS method and a 7% larger luminosity than the LAr method. The MBTS (LAr) method has a systematic uncertainty of 4% (5%) that is uncorrelated with the Track method, while the uncorrelated systematic uncertainty of the Track Counting method is 2%.
https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/TrackLumivsMBTSLArLumi.142193.png
eps file
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http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/atlas_specLuminosity_run142193_2009.png
http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/atlas_specLuminosity_run142383_2009.png
http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/atlas_specLuminosity_run142402_2009.png
http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/IPpositions_B1B2_16Dec09.png
 
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When the stable beam flag is raised, the inner detector and muon systems undergo a so-called "warm start", which includes a ramp of the high-voltage and, for the pixel system, the preamplifiers are turned on. This procedure takes typically several minutes, which, in case of short stable beam periods, sums up to a significant fraction. This dominates the quoted inefficiencies. Longer runs and automation of the warm start will help to reduce the inefficiency.

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http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/atlas-on-and-dq-eff-dec09_v3.pdf
PNG version of table
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http://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/DATAPREPARATION/PublicPlots/dec2009/atlas-on-and-dq-eff-dec09_v3.png
PDF version of table
 
 
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