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ApprovedPlotsTileCalibrationLaser

Introduction

This page lists the public plots produced within the Tile Calorimeter calibration group. The results obtained using the Laser calibration system are presented.

Approved Tile Calorimeter Laser Calibration Plots


Evolution of the mean relative response of several A- and D-cells in the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter as a function of calibration run number, as measured by the laser calibration system, displayed by Tile-in-One data quality assessment web tool. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p , while the response recovery occurs during technical stops and heavy ion collision periods. The starting run number for the collisions is 324320 (May 23th 2017).
Contacts: juraj.smiesko@cern.ch, r.oreamuno@cern.ch
Reference: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2696194
Date: November, 2019

Screenshot of Tile-in-One Laser Monitoring Plugin

This plot shows the time evolution of the TileCal cell response to laser calibrations in LHC Run 2. The average PMT response of same type cells in laser runs is normalised to the calibration run taken on July 17 th , 2015, at the start of LHC Run 2. Percentage variation with time is shown. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during heavy-ion collisions and technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells A10, A12, A13, and A14 of the TileCal inner layer and the special cells E1, E2, E3, and E4 located in the gap between the calorimeter Barrel and End-Cap sections.
Contacts: giulia.di.gregorio@cern.ch, sandra.leone@pi.infn.it, and fabrizio.scuri@pi.infn.it
Reference: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2317070?ln=it
Date: May, 2018

Cell_evolution_2015-18_Preliminary.png
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This plot shows the evolution of the average PMT relative response as a function of the integrated anode charge. Response in laser runs is normalised to the calibration run on July 17 th 2015, just before the LHC Run 2 start. Anode integrated charge as a function of the integrated luminosity is computed with the measured average integrator current of each cell type and the corresponding coefficients for instantaneous luminosity to anode current conversion. Points correspond to the average relative response loss of different cell types (A10, A12, A13, A14, E1, E2, E3 and E4), measured at the end of each year p-p collisions during LHC Run 2. Point distribution is fitted with a double exponential function. Higher integrated charge points dominated by the responses of the special cells E2, E3, and E4. Error on the integrated charge is dominated by the error on the integrator current to luminosity factors. Error on the relative response is dominated by the day-to-day fluctuation of the average response of same type cells.
Contacts: giulia.di.gregorio@cern.ch, sandra.leone@pi.infn.it, and fabrizio.scuri@pi.infn.it
Reference: https://cds.cern.ch/record/2317070?ln=it
Date: May, 2018

PMT_response_VS_charge_detector_Preliminary.png
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This plot shows the mean gain variation (in %) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter photo- multiplers that read the signal deposited in each channel, as a function of eta and radius, between the 21 April 2012 and the 19 March 2012 (before the start of proton collisions). The gain in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT in the absence of collisions. The mean gain variation of the 10000 TileCal channels is computed cell by cell. For each cell, the gain variation is defined as the mean of the gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels associated to this cell. A total of 64 modules in phi are used for each cell while known pathological channels were excluded. The observed down-drift of <2% mostly affects cells at inner radius, that are the cells with higher current.
Contact: Djamel Boumediene, Emmanuelle Dubreuil
Date: May 2012
Reference: CDS entry

cells_var_lg_201625.png
These plots show the distribution of gain variation (in %) in the 10000 ATLAS Tile calorimeter photomultipliers that read the signal deposited in each channel, between 2 Cesium scans taken on November 2012 and December 2012, in low gain (top) and high gain (down). The gain in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT in the absence of collisions. Known pathological channels (<1%) and dead modules were excluded. The resolution displayed on the plot is the sigma of a Gaussian fit of the distribution. This value is coherent with the intrinsic resolution of Laser system. The channels in the tail are the drifting channels and corrected by the Laser system.


Contact: Djamel Boumediene, Emmanuelle Dubreuil Emmanuelle.Dubreuil@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: December 2012

channels_var_lg.png
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channels_var_hg.png
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This plot shows the measured gain variation of TileCal photomultipliers (PMT) when the divider hight voltage (V) is modified by few Volts. For small variation $\Delta$V, around the nominal high voltage V, the expected gain variation is given by $\Delta$G/G=$\beta$$\times$$\Delta$V/V (where $beta$ is a characteristic of each PMT). The gain variation is measured via the response variation to an incident laser beam illuminating simultameously the TileCal PMTs through optical fibers. The measurement of the gain variation uses a statistical method based on the relation between the PMT gain, the average reconstructed charge and its variance.

On this plot each point represents the average gain variation of ~500 PMT on which the high voltage was changed. The dashed line represents the expected gain variation. The measured gain variation matches with the expectation within 0.2%, for gain variation of 0.1 to 5%.
Contact: Vincent Giangiobbe Vincent.Giangiobbe@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: June 2011

LaserHVScan.eps
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This plot shows the measured gain variation vs time (in a period of about three weeks) of one PMT with an unstable applied high voltage. The gain variation is deduced from the response variation to an incident laser beam illuminating this PMT. The light blue line represents the expected gain variation, computed from the measured variation of the high voltage V ( DeltaG/G=(DeltaV/V)^beta). Two methods are used to measure the gain changes.

The blue points are obtained using a direct measurement of the relative gain variation (the gain is proportional to the PMT response normalized to intensity of the incident light measured by a set of photodiodes).

The red points are obtained with a statistical method (the gain is extracted from the mean and variance of the PMT response, without need to know the intensity of the laser). Both methods are in good agreement with the expected gain variation.
Contact: Vincent Giangiobbe Vincent.Giangiobbe@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: June 2011

LaserSingleChannel.eps
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Evolution of the mean relative response of the E1, E2, E3 and E4 cells to one or more other cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells (E1, E2, E3 \& E4), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a reference run taken prior to the start of collisions (3 Feb. 2012). PMTs with bad quality status, or problematic high voltage have been excluded. Only statistical uncertainty errors are shown. The method used to analyze the laser data has a systematic uncertainty of $\pm1.1\%$ on the average relative response (not displayed). Very similar results are obtained using low gain signals.
Contact: Henric Wilkens Henric.Wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch and David W. Miller David.W.Miller@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: April 2013

Laser-CFMethod-ATLASPrelim.png


[eps] [pdf

Evolution of the mean relative response of the E1, E2, E3 and E4 cells to one or more other cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells (E1, E2, E3 \& E4), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a reference run taken prior to the start of collisions (3 Feb. 2012). PMTs with bad quality status, or problematic high voltage have been excluded. Only statistical uncertainty errors are shown. The method used to analyze the laser data has a systematic uncertainty of \pm1.1\% on the average relative response (not displayed). Very similar results are obtained using low gain signals.
The LHC delivered luminosity and the ATLAS recorded luminosity (LuminosityPublicResults) are provided for comparison. Three LHC machine development periods (available here (PDF) ) are indicated by the dashed lines (21-29 April, 18 June-1 July, and 10-23 September).

Contact: Henric Wilkens Henric.Wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch and David W. Miller David.W.Miller@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: April 2013

Laser-CFMethod-ATLASPrelim-WithLumi.png


[pdf]

Normalized response of a TileCal PMT illuminated with the upgraded laser calibration system, time evolution (laser II). The stability of the upgraded laser system has been tested using a spare TileCal module on the surface (bld. 175). Data have been taken for about one month (August 2014). In this plot, the response of PMT 1 of the TileCal module has been normalized to the response of one of the diodes monitoring laser light intensity (D0). Data have then been normalized to the first run. The PMT normalized response has an RMS to mean ratio of $5.2 \cdot 10^{-3}$ over one month time period, thus being more stable than old laser system (old system stability in time was about 1%). Such a stability is compatible with the expectations of laser II project.
Contact: Margherita Spalla margherita.spalla@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2014
laserII_stability_PMT1overD0_2014.png
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This plot shows the stability of diodes monitoring the light in laser II system, represented as a function of time. Data have been taken from the end of July to September 2014. The gap between 09/04 and 09/18 is due to technical issues. In this plot, the response of diode D3 has been normalized to reference diode D0. D0 is a monitor of laser intensity, D3 is the monitor of the light transmitted after a first beam expander and a light filter. Data have then been normalized to the first run. The laser II optics box contains seven monitor diodes, D3/D0 is a typical example of diode response time evolution. D3/D0 has an RMS to mean ratio of $7.9 \cdot 10^{-3}$ over one month time period, thus being more stable than old laser system (old system stability in time above 1%). Such a stability is compatible with the expectations of laser II project.
Contact: Margherita Spalla margherita.spalla@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2014
laserII_stability_D3overD0_2014.png
[PDF]
LASER internal calibration system : relative pedestal variation as a function of time. For each photodiode (D0 to D9 plus Phocal), mean (high gain) pedestal values are normalized to the mean pedestal value of the first measurement of the period considered.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_Ped_Stability_HG.png
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LASER internal calibration system : relative pedestal variation as a function of time. For each photodiode (D0 to D9), mean (low gain) pedestal values are normalized to the mean pedestal value of the first measurement of the period considered.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_Ped_Stability_HG_nophocal.png
[EPS]
LASER internal calibration system : pedestal stability over a three-months period. For each photodiode, a distribution of the means of the pedestal values is drawn for the period considered. The stability is defined as the RMS of this distribution normalized to its mean.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_Ped_Stability_summary.png
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LASER internal calibration system : stability of the Phocal photodiode with respect to alpha particles. Mean signal values are normalized to the mean signal value of the first measurement of the period considered. Pedestals are subtracted (dots and squares). Results with pedestal corrected for a drift over the same period are also shown (★ and *).
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_Alpha_Stability.png
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LASER internal calibration system : relative LED signal variation as a function of time. For each photodiode mean (high gain) signal values are normalized to the Phocal signal and to the mean signal value of the first measurement of the period considered. Pedestals are subtracted.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_Led_Stability_HG.png
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LASER internal calibration system : LED signal stability over a three-months period. For each photodiode, a distribution of the means of the LED signal values normalized to the PHOCAL mean signal is drawn for the period considered. The stability is defined as the RMS of this distribution normalized to its mean.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_Led_Stability_summary.png
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LASER internal calibration system : relative CIS signal variation as a function of time. For each photodiode (D0 to D9 plus Phocal), mean (low gain) signal values are normalized to the mean signal value of the first measurement of the period considered. Pedestals are subtracted and the charge injected is 256 pC.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_CIS_Stability_LG_20k.png
[EPS]
LASER internal calibration system : CIS signal stability over a three-months period. For each photodiode and for each CIS value, a distribution of the means of the CIS signal values is drawn for the period considered. The stability is defined as the RMS of this distribution normalized to its mean.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_CIS_Stability_Summary.png
[EPS]
LASER internal calibration system : pedestal and LED signals (low and high gains) QDC distributions for diode D0. The dynamic range of the QDC (0-8192) is also shown.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_Illustr_Diode0.png
[EPS]
LASER internal calibration system : pedestal, LED signal and alpha signals (low and high gains) QDC distributions for the Phocal photodiode.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_Illustr_Phocal.png
[EPS]
LASER internal calibration system : CIS (low and high gains) QDC distributions for D0. The dynamic range of the QDC(0-8192) is also shown.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_Illustr_CIS.png
[EPS]
LASER internal calibration system : summary of stability results over a three-months period.
Contact: Philippe Gris philippe.gris@clermontNOSPAMPLEASE.in2p3.fr
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
LaserII_table.png
[PDF]
LASER monitor system : laser intensity monitors. Time evolution of the response of the diodes monitoring the laser intensity in standard calibration runs. First plot is from Low Gain (LG) setting runs (filter transmission = 32%), second plot is from High Gain (HG) setting runs (filter transmission = 1%). Monitor responses are normalized to diode D0 (for absorbing run-to-run laser intensity fluctuations) and to the first day of observation. Statistical error on each point is negligible. As expected, the response is the same in the two cases because the these intensity monitors receive laser light before the filtering made downstream in the optical path.
Contact: fabrizio.scuri@pi.infn.it
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
Laser_intensity_monitors_LG.png
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Laser_intensity_monitors_HG.png
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LASER monitor system : filter transmission monitors. Time evolution of the response of the filter transmission monitors in standard laser calibration runs. First plot is from Low Gain (LG) calibration runs (filter transmission = 32%), second plot is from High Gain (HG) calibration runs (filter transmission = 1%). The evolution of the stability of the diode response ratio, normalized to the first observation day, is shown. Statistical errors are negligible. Big fluctuations in the HG case are dominated by the systematics introduced by the pedestal subtraction procedure with pedestal values much larger than the signal amplitude in this case.


Contact: fabrizio.scuri@pi.infn.it
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015

Filter_intensity_monitors_LG.png
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Filter_intensity_monitors_HG.png
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LASER monitor system : expander transmission monitors. Time evolution of the response of the expander transmission monitors in standard laser calibration runs. First plot is from Low Gain (LG) calibration runs (filter transmission = 32%), second plot is from High Gain (HG) calibration runs (filter transmission = 1%). The evolution of the stability of the diode response ratio, normalized to the first observation day, is shown. Statistical errors are negligible.


Contact: fabrizio.scuri@pi.infn.it
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015

Expander_intensity_monitors_LG.png
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Expander_intensity_monitors_HG.png
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LASER monitor system : evolution of the PMT response of the D2-cells in laser standard calibration runs (Low Gain settings, filter transmission = 32%). Average response of odd and even PMTs of partition LBA and of even PMTs of partition LBC normalized to the average response of even PMTs of detector partition LBC and to the first observation day. The long term stability is within +/- 0.3 % in all cases. Statistical errors are negligible. D2-cell average response can be used for the observation period as a stable reference.


Contact: fabrizio.scuri@pi.infn.it
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015

D2-cells_laser_evolution.png
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LASER monitor system : overall stability. Monitor response evolution normalized to the average PMT response of detector D2-cells, stable within 0.3%, and to the first observation day for both low gain (filter transmission = 32%) and high gain (filter transmission = 1%) standard laser calibration runs.
Contact: fabrizio.scuri@pi.infn.it
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015
Diode_overall_stability_LG.png
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Diode_overall_stability_HG.png
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LASER monitor system : summary of the stability performances. Short term (1 month, typical interval between two Cesium source scans) and long term (4 month observation) stability of the Laser system internal monitors. The RMS values are computed from the distributions of the variation with time of the responses normalized to the average and to the first observation day. The maximum values are relative to the variation with time of the less stable monitor. The overall values are computed from the distribution of the average monitor response normalized to the average PMT response of the detector D2-cells (assumed to be stable). Systematic effects due to drifts in the transmission of the clear fibers to the individual detector channels are not subtracted here.


Contact: fabrizio.scuri@pi.infn.it
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015

LaserII_monitor_summary.png
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Detector PMT response to LASER_II excitation : global detector PMT response. Average response of all good detector channels in laser calibrations normalized to diode D6 (monitor of the light transmitted by the beam-expander in the optics box) and to the first observation day. High gain points are from calibration runs with filter transmission = 1%, low gain points are form calibration runs with filter transmission = 32%. Statistical errors are negligible. Drifts of the global response may indicate a general degradation of the transmission of the 100 meter long clear fibers connecting the beam expander to each individual module of the detector.


Contact: Henric.Wilkens@cern.ch and fabrizio.scuri@pi.infn.it
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015

Global_evolution.png
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Detector PMT response to LASER_II excitation : examples of PMT response of individual modules. Average response of all good module channels in laser calibrations normalized to diode D6 (monitor of the light transmitted by the beam-expander in the optics box) and to the first observation day. High gain points are from calibration runs with filter transmission = 1%, low gain points are form calibration runs with filter transmission = 32%. Statistical errors are negligible. Drifts of the individual module response may indicate a problem with the optics associated to a module (long clear fiber plus light distribution internal to the module).


Contact: Henric.Wilkens@cern.ch and fabrizio.scuri@pi.infn.it
Reference: CDS , Approval meeting
Date: October 2015

LBA32_evolution.png
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LBA61_evolution.png
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This plot shows the distribution of gain variation (in %) in the 10000 ATLAS Tile calorimeter photomultipliers that read the signal deposited in each channel, between the 17 July 2015 and 28 August 2015, where the integrated luminosity was small enough to not induce gain drifts. The gain variation in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT, in low gain, in the absence of collisions. The statistical accuracy of the laser is at the order of the RMS. The channels in the tail are drifting channels.


Contact: Djamel Boumediene, Arthur Chomont arthur.chomont@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: October 2015

LaserDev_august.png
[png] [pdf]
These plots show the mean gain variation (in %) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter photomultipliers that read the signal deposited in each channel, as a function of eta and radius, between the 28 August 2015 and the 4 October 2015. The gain in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT in the absence of collisions. The mean gain variation of the 10000 TileCal channels is computed cell by cell. For each cell, the gain variation distribution is defined as the mean of the gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels associated to this cell. A total of 64 modules in phi are used for each cell while known pathological channels were excluded. The observed down-drift of< 2% mostly affects cells at inner radius, that are the cells with higher current.


Contact: Djamel Boumediene, Arthur Chomont
Date: October 2015

cells_var_lg_280962_v1.png
[png] [pdf]
cells_var_lg_280962_v2.png
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This plot shows the mean gain variation (in %) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter photo-multipliers that read the signal deposited in each channel, as a function of eta and radius, between the 24 May 2016 and the 27 October 2016 (covering most of the 2016 proton collisions period). The gain in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT in the absence of collisions. The mean gain variation of the 10000 TileCal channels is computed cell by cell. For each cell, the gain variation is defined as the mean of the gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels associated to this cell. A total of 64 modules in phi are used for each cell while known pathological channels were excluded. The observed down-drift mostly affects cells at inner radius, that are the cells with higher current.


Contact: Djamel Boumediene Djamel.Boumediene@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Pawel Klimek Pawel.Klimek@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 19 December 2016

tile_laser_map_run311556.png
[pdf][png]

This plot shows the mean gain variation (in $\%$) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter photo-multipliers that read the signal deposited in each channel, as a function of eta and radius, between the 17 February and the 24 October 2018 (covering the entire 2018 proton collisions period). The gain in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT in the absence of collisions. The mean gain variation of the 10000 TileCal channels is computed cell by cell using the Combined method, and calculated with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the initial date (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th 2018). For each cell, the gain variation is defined as the mean of the gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels associated to this cell. A total of 64 modules in phi are used for each cell while known pathological channels were excluded, and only laser runs taken with high gain readout are used (position 8 of the filter wheel in the laser system). The observed down-drift mostly affects cells at inner radius, that are the cells with higher current.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Rute Pedro rute.pedro@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch, Arely Cortes Gonzalez arelycg@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 5 November 2018
tile_laser_map364346.png
[pdf][png]

This plot shows the mean gain variation (in $\%$) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter photo-multipliers that read the signal deposited in each channel, as a function of eta and radius, between the 6 March and 11 November 2017 (covering the entire 2017 proton collisions period). The gain in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT in the absence of collisions. The mean gain variation of the 10000 TileCal channels is computed cell by cell using the Combined method, and calculated with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the initial date (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th 2017). For each cell, the gain variation is defined as the mean of the gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels associated to this cell. A total of 64 modules in phi are used for each cell while known pathological channels were excluded, and only laser runs taken with high gain readout are used (position 8 of the filter wheel in the laser system). The observed down-drift mostly affects cells at inner radius, that are the cells with higher current. The mean gain variation is corrected for changes in high voltage (HV). The HV correction affects mostly E3 and E4 cells, since their HV was significantly decreased in 26th July 2017, from 750 to 700~V and from 750 to 650~V, respectively.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Rute Pedro rute.pedro@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch, Arely Cortes Gonzalez arelycg@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 5 November 2018
tile_laser_map_340583_HVcorrection.png
[eps][pdf][png]

This plots shows the mean gain variation (in %) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter photo-multipliers that read the signal deposited in each channel, as a function of eta and radius, between the 06th March and the 11th November 2017. The gain in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT in the absence of collisions. The mean gain variation of 10000 TileCal channels is computed cell by cell using the combined method(without smoothing), and calculated with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the initial date (all laser runs within 10 days of March 06th ,2017). For each cell, the gain variation is defined as the mean gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels associated to this cell. A total of 64 modules in phi are used for each cell while known pathological channels were excluded, and only laser runs taken with high gain readout are used (position 8 of the filter wheel in the laser system). The observed down-drift mostly affects cells at inner radius, that are the cells with higher current. The mean gain variation is corrected for changes in high voltage (HV). The HV correction affects mostly E3 and E4 cells, since their HV was significantly decreased in 26th July 2017, from 750 to 700~V and from 750 to 650~V, respectively.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch, Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 18 November 2019
tile_laser_map340583_PawelRef.png
[eps][pdf][png]

This plots shows the mean gain variation (in %) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter photo-multipliers that read the signal deposited in each channel, as a function of eta and radius, between the 23rd May[start of pp collisions] and the 11th November 2017 [end of pp collisions] (covering the entire 2017 proton collisions period). The gain in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT in the absence of collisions. The mean gain variation of 10000 TileCal channels is computed cell by cell using the combined method(without smoothing), and calculated with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the initial date (all laser runs within 10 days of May 23rd ,2017). For each cell, the gain variation is defined as the mean gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels associated to this cell. A total of 64 modules in phi are used for each cell while known pathological channels were excluded, and only laser runs taken with high gain readout are used (position 8 of the filter wheel in the laser system). The observed down-drift mostly affects cells at inner radius, that are the cells with higher current. The mean gain variation is corrected for changes in high voltage (HV). The HV correction affects mostly E3 and E4 cells, since their HV was significantly decreased in 26th July 2017, from 750 to 700~V and from 750 to 650~V, respectively.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch, Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 18 November 2019
tile_laser_map340583_myRef.png
[eps][pdf][png]

This plots shows the mean gain variation (in %) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter photo-multipliers that read the signal deposited in each channel, as a function of eta and radius, between the 17th February and the 22nd October 2018. The gain in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT in the absence of collisions. The mean gain variation of 10000 TileCal channels is computed cell by cell using the combined method(without smoothing), and calculated with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the initial date (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th ,2018). For each cell, the gain variation is defined as the mean gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels associated to this cell. A total of 64 modules in phi are used for each cell while known pathological channels were excluded, and only laser runs taken with high gain readout are used (position 8 of the filter wheel in the laser system). The observed down-drift mostly affects cells at inner radius, that are the cells with higher current.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch, Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 18 November 2019
tile_laser_map364147_PawelRef.png
[eps][pdf][png]

This plots shows the mean gain variation (in %) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter photo-multipliers that read the signal deposited in each channel, as a function of eta and radius, between the between the 18th April [start of pp collisions] and the 22nd October 2018 [end of pp collisions] (covering the entire 2018 proton collisions period). The gain in each PMT is measured using a laser calibration system that sends a controlled amount of light in the photocathode of each PMT in the absence of collisions. The mean gain variation of 10000 TileCal channels is computed cell by cell using the combined method(without smoothing), and calculated with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the initial date (all laser runs within 10 days of April 18th ,2018). For each cell, the gain variation is defined as the mean gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels associated to this cell. A total of 64 modules in phi are used for each cell while known pathological channels were excluded, and only laser runs taken with high gain readout are used (position 8 of the filter wheel in the laser system). The observed down-drift mostly affects cells at inner radius, that are the cells with higher current.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch, Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 18 November 2019
tile_laser_map364147_myRef.png
[eps][pdf][png]

The mean gain variation (in percent) of the channels of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of the polar angle (φ) and the layer is shown. The gain variation of a channel is the response of the photomultiplier (PMT) to the controlled amount of light sent by the laser calibration system, in the absence of collisions, measured between May 28th, 2016 (run 300371) and October 27th, 2016 (run 311556, taken at the end of proton-proton collisions). The PMT mean gain variation is defined as the mean of the gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels, arranged into φ bins. One φ bin corresponds to one module per partition. The layer closest to the beam axis is composed of A cells, next layer is formed of the B and C type cells, while the outermost layer consists of D cells. The channels with known problems are not taken into account.


Contact: Djamel Boumediene Djamel.Boumediene@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Marija Marjanovic marija.marjanovic@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 04 August 2017

tile_laser_lb_map_phi_public.png
[png][pdf] tile_laser_eb_map_phi_public.png
[png][pdf]

The mean gain variation (in percent) of the channels of the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of the polar angle (φ) and the layer is shown. The gain variation of a channel is the response of the photomultiplier (PMT) to the controlled amount of light sent by the laser calibration system, in the absence of collisions, measured between May 28th, 2016 (run 300371) and October 27th, 2016 (run 311556, taken at the end of proton-proton collisions). The PMT mean gain variation is defined as the mean of the gaussian function that fits the gain variation distribution of the channels, arranged into φ bins. One φ bin corresponds to one module per partition. The layers are composed of gap/crack cells (E4 cells (1.4-1.6 in η), E3 cells (1.2-1.4 in η), followed by E2 cells (1.1-1.2 in η), while the outermost layer consists of E1 cells (1.0-1.1 in η)). Four cells of the E1 layer are not shown in the plot as they are not connected to the readout electronics. The channels with known problems are not taken into account.


Contact: Djamel Boumediene Djamel.Boumediene@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Marija Marjanovic marija.marjanovic@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 04 August 2017

tile_laser_Ecells_map_phi_public.png
[png][pdf]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of June 12th, 2015). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during heavy-ion collisions and technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of theTileCalinner layer A.

Contact: Arely Cortes Gonzalez arelycg@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 25 September 2018

LaserDrift_2015.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of June 12th, 2015). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. In Layer A the Gaussian width increases faster with time due to different drift of cells at different eta positions. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.

Contact: Arely Cortes Gonzalez arelycg@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 25 September 2018

LaserRMS_2015.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of April 2nd, 2016). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during heavy-ion collisions and technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of theTileCalinner layer A.

Contact: Arely Cortes Gonzalez arelycg@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 25 September 2018

LaserDrift_2016.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of April 2nd, 2016). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. In Layer A the Gaussian width increases faster with time due to different drift of cells at different eta positions. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.

Contact: Arely Cortes Gonzalez arelycg@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 25 September 2018

LaserRMS_2016.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during heavy-ion collisions and technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of theTileCalinner layer A.

Contact: Arely Cortes Gonzalez arelycg@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 25 September 2018

LaserDrift_2017.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. In Layer A the Gaussian width increases faster with time due to different drift of cells at different eta positions. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.

Contact: Arely Cortes Gonzalez arelycg@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 25 September 2018

LaserRMS_2017.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of the TileCal inner layer A.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
Averagelayers_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The Gaussian width is plotted.The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
Averagelayers_gausianWidth_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean.PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of the TileCal inner layer A. Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
Averagelayers_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. In Layer A the Gaussian width increases faster with time due to different drift of cells at different eta positions. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements. Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
Averagelayers_gausianWidth_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of the TileCal inner layer A.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
Averagelayers_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. In Layer A the Gaussian width increases faster with time due to different drift of cells at different eta positions. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
Averagelayers_gausianWidth_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th, 2018). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during heavy-ion collisions and technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of theTileCalinner layer A.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 20 May 2019
Averagelayers_2018.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the 3 longitudinal layers (A, BC, D) in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th, 2018). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. In Layer A the Gaussian width increases faster with time due to different drift of cells at different eta positions. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 20 May 2019
Averagelayers_gausianWidth_2018.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the A9, A10, A12, A13 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells(A9,A10,A12,A13), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of the TileCal inner layer A.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
ACells_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the A9,A10,A12,A13 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. In Layer A the Gaussian width increases faster with time due to different drift of cells at different eta positions. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
Acells_gausianWidth_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the A9, A10, A12, A13 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells(A9,A10,A12,A13), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of the TileCal inner layer A.Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
ACells_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the A9,A10,A12,A13 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. In Layer A the Gaussian width increases faster with time due to different drift of cells at different eta positions. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
Acells_gausianWidth_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the A9, A10, A12, A13 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells(A9,A10,A12,A13), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of the TileCal inner layer A.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
ACells_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the A9,A10,A12,A13 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. In Layer A the Gaussian width increases faster with time due to different drift of cells at different eta positions. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
Acells_gausianWidth_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the A9, A10, A12, A13 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells(A9,A10,A12,A13), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th, 2018). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during heavy-ion collisions and technical stops. Down-drifts mostly affect PMTs reading out the most exposed cells of theTileCalinner layer A.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 20 May 2019
AcellsAverageResponse2018.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the A9,A10,A12,A13 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th, 2018). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. In Layer A the Gaussian width increases faster with time due to different drift of cells at different eta positions. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 20 May 2019
AcellsGaussianWidth2018.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the BC2,BC8,B9 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of BC-cells(LB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean .PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCLBCells_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the BC2,BC8 AND B9 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCLB_gausianWidth_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the BC2,BC8,B9 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of BC-cells(LB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean .PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCLBCells_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the BC2,BC8 AND B9 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCLB_gausianWidth_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the BC2,BC8,B9 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of BC-cells(LB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCLBCells_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the BC2,BC8 AND B9 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCLB_gausianWidth_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the B11,B14,C10 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of BC-cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCEBCells_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the B11,B14 and C10 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCEB_gausianWidth_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the B11,B14,C10 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of BC-cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCEBCells_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the B11,B14 and C10 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width.PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCEB_gausianWidth_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the B11,B14,C10 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of BC-cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean.PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCEBCells_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the B11,B14 and C10 cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. While the width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
BCEB_gausianWidth_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the long barrel (LB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D-cells(LB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DLBCells_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the long barrel (LB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D- cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The Gaussian width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DLB_gausianWidth_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the long barrel (LB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D-cells(LB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DLBCells_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the long barrel (LB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D- cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The Gaussian width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DLB_gausianWidth_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the long barrel (LB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D-cells(LB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DLBCells_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the long barrel (LB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D- cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The Gaussian width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DLB_gausianWidth_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the long barrel (LB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D-cells(LB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th, 2018). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during heavy-ion collisions and technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 20 May 2019
DLBcellsAverageResonse2018.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the long barrel (LB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D-cells(LB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th, 2018). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The Gaussian width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 20 May 2019
DLBcellsGaussianWidth2018.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the long barrel (LB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D-cells(LB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DEBCells_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the long barrel (LB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D- cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of July 17th, 2015). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The Gaussian width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DEB_gausianWidth_2015.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the extended barrel (EB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D- cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean.PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down- drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops. Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DEBCells_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the extended barrel (EB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D- cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of May 24th, 2016). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The Gaussian width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements. Laser Calibration was not operating during the gap region starting from 10th Sep,2016 till 27th Sep,2016 as seen in the plot.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DEB_gausianWidth_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the extended barrel (EB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D- cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian mean. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down- drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DEBCells_2017.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the extended barrel (EB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D- cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs (all laser runs within 10 days of March 6th, 2017). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width. PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The Gaussian width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 26 September 2019
DEB_gausianWidth_2016.png
[eps] [pdf][png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the extended barrel (EB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D-cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th, 2018). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during heavy-ion collisions and technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 20 May 2019
DEBcellsAverageResonse2018.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the extended barrel (EB) D-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of D-cells(EB), the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th, 2018). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The Gaussian width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 20 May 2019
DEBcellsGaussianWidth2018.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the mean relative response of the E-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured by the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of E-cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to the distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th, 2018). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The down-drifts of the PMT response coincide with p-p collision periods, while the response recovery occurs during heavy-ion collisions and technical stops.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 20 May 2019
EcellsAverageResonse2018.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]

Evolution of the Gaussian width of the response of the E-cells in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter as a function of time, as measured from the laser calibration system. The light intensity was chosen to trigger the high gain readout of the PMTs. For each type of E-cells, the mean response was estimated using a Gaussian fit to distribution of PMT response variation with respect to a set of reference runs taken prior to the start of collisions (all laser runs within 10 days of February 17th, 2018). The Gaussian width is plotted. The error corresponds to the error of the fitted Gaussian width (smaller than the markers). PMTs with bad quality status, problematic high voltage or flagged as affected by any calibration system have been excluded. The LHC delivered luminosity is shown for comparison. The Gaussian width increases with time due to different behavior in different PMTs, the first data point reflects the intrinsic RMS of the laser measurements.
Reference: Approval meeting
Contact: Ammara Ahmad ammara.ahmad@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch Henric Wilkens henric.wilkens@cernNOSPAMPLEASE.ch
Date: 20 May 2019
EcellsGaussianWidth2018.png
[eps] [pdf] [png]


Major updates:
-- PawelKlimek - 2019-11-13

Responsible: PawelKlimek
Subject: public

Topic attachments
I Attachment History Action Size Date Who Comment
Unknown file formateps BCLB_gausianWidth_2015.eps r1 manage 36.5 K 2019-11-15 - 11:38 AmmaraAhmad Cell evolution and gaussian width plots using combined method
PDFpdf BCLB_gausianWidth_2015.pdf r1 manage 33.2 K 2019-11-15 - 11:38 AmmaraAhmad Cell evolution and gaussian width plots using combined method
PNGpng BCLB_gausianWidth_2015.png r1 manage 78.7 K 2019-11-15 - 11:38 AmmaraAhmad Cell evolution and gaussian width plots using combined method
Unknown file formateps BCLB_gausianWidth_2016.eps r1 manage 45.4 K 2019-11-15 - 11:38 AmmaraAhmad Cell evolution and gaussian width plots using combined method
PDFpdf BCLB_gausianWidth_2016.pdf r1 manage 40.7 K 2019-11-15 - 11:38 AmmaraAhmad Cell evolution and gaussian width plots using combined method
PNGpng BCLB_gausianWidth_2016.png r1 manage 90.0 K 2019-11-15 - 11:38 AmmaraAhmad Cell evolution and gaussian width plots using combined method
Unknown file formateps BCLB_gausianWidth_2017.eps r1 manage 67.5 K 2019-11-15 - 11:38 AmmaraAhmad Cell evolution and gaussian width plots using combined method
PDFpdf BCLB_gausianWidth_2017.pdf r1 manage 58.4 K 2019-11-15 - 11:38 AmmaraAhmad Cell evolution and gaussian width plots using combined method
PNGpng BCLB_gausianWidth_2017.png r1 manage 100.8 K 2019-11-15 - 11:38 AmmaraAhmad Cell evolution and gaussian width plots using combined method
Unknown file formateps tile_laser_map340583_PawelRef.eps r1 manage 29.1 K 2019-11-18 - 13:55 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2017 using combined method
PDFpdf tile_laser_map340583_PawelRef.pdf r1 manage 6.8 K 2019-11-18 - 13:55 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2017 using combined method
PNGpng tile_laser_map340583_PawelRef.png r1 manage 107.4 K 2019-11-18 - 13:55 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2017 using combined method
Unknown file formateps tile_laser_map340583_myRef.eps r1 manage 29.1 K 2019-11-18 - 13:55 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2017 using combined method
PDFpdf tile_laser_map340583_myRef.pdf r1 manage 6.7 K 2019-11-18 - 13:55 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2017 using combined method
PNGpng tile_laser_map340583_myRef.png r1 manage 105.2 K 2019-11-18 - 13:55 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2017 using combined method
Unknown file formateps tile_laser_map364147_PawelRef.eps r1 manage 29.2 K 2019-11-21 - 15:22 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2018 using combined method
PDFpdf tile_laser_map364147_PawelRef.pdf r1 manage 6.7 K 2019-11-21 - 15:22 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2018 using combined method
PNGpng tile_laser_map364147_PawelRef.png r1 manage 107.2 K 2019-11-21 - 15:22 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2018 using combined method
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PDFpdf tile_laser_map364147_myRef.pdf r1 manage 6.7 K 2019-11-21 - 15:09 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2018 using combined method
PNGpng tile_laser_map364147_myRef.png r1 manage 108.7 K 2019-11-21 - 15:09 AmmaraAhmad Laser eta maps for 2018 using combined method
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