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Event Displays from Run 3 splashes and collision data

The event displays below are approved to be shown by ATLAS speakers at conferences and similar events. Click on the thumbnail images to access full-size displays. If you wish to use these event displays for other purposes than presentations of ATLAS results, please see the copyright statement.

This page shows events from the Run 3 splashes and collisions starting in 2021 not included in any publications. The main Event Display Public Page gives an overview of public event displays which can all be found via the event display search engine.

13.6 TeV collisions 2022

Event display (Run 428648, Event 633647719) of a collision event containing a Z->tautau candidate in a final state with a muon and the visible products of a hadronically-decaying tau lepton. The event was recorded on July, 19 2022 when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV per beam were delivered by the LHC. The figure shows a 2D axial view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the center of the ATLAS detector, the hits and reconstructed tracks of the charged particles in the Inner Detector are shown as cyan-coloured dots and lines, respectively. The energy deposits in the electromagnetic (the green layer) and hadronic (the red layer) calorimeters are shown as yellow boxes. The hits in the Muon Spectrometer (the outer blue layer) are shown as orange blocks. The white cone represents the reconstructed jet seeding the ATLAS reconstruction of hadronically-decaying tau leptons. The green, blue and red tracks inside the cone are identified as originating from three charged pions compatible with the visible decays of a tau lepton. Their transverse momenta are 14.6 GeV, 5.5 GeV and 4.2 GeV. The energy deposits in yellow inside the white cone are the most energetic clusters of cells in the event. On the opposite side of the cone, a single isolated track (shown in orange) is detected by the Inner Detector and the Muon Spectrometer, consistent with an isolated muon from a leptonically decaying tau lepton. JiveXML_428648_633647719-YX.png
Event display (Run 428648, Event 633647719) of a collision event containing a Z->tautau candidate in a final state with a muon and the visible products of a hadronically-decaying tau lepton. The event was recorded on July, 19 2022 when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV per beam were delivered by the LHC. The figure shows a 2D axial view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the center of the ATLAS detector, the hits and reconstructed tracks of the charged particles in the Inner Detector are shown as cyan-coloured dots and lines, respectively. The energy deposits in the electromagnetic (the green layer) and hadronic (the red layer) calorimeters are shown as yellow boxes. The white cone represents the reconstructed jet seeding the ATLAS reconstruction of hadronically-decaying tau leptons. The green, blue and red tracks inside the cone are identified as originating from three charged pions consistent with the visible decays of the tau lepton. Their transverse momenta are 14.6 GeV, 5.5 GeV and 4.2 GeV, respectively. The energy deposits in yellow inside the white cone are the most energetic clusters of cells in the event. On the opposite side of the cone, a single isolated track (shown in orange) is detected by the Inner Detector and the Muon Spectrometer (not shown on this figure), consistent with an isolated muon from a leptonically decaying tau lepton. JiveXML_428648_633647719-YX-zoomed.png
Event display (Run 428648, Event 633647719) of a collision event containing a Z->tautau candidate in a final state with a muon and the visible products of a hadronically-decaying tau lepton. The event was recorded on July, 19 2022 when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV per beam were delivered by the LHC. The figure shows a 2D side view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the center of the ATLAS detector, the hits and reconstructed tracks of the charged particles in the Inner Detector are shown as cyan-coloured dots and lines, respectively. The energy deposits in the electromagnetic (the green layer) and hadronic (the red layer) calorimeters are shown as yellow boxes. The hits in the Muon Spectrometer (the outer blue layer) are shown as orange blocks. The white cone represent the reconstructed jet seeding the ATLAS reconstruction of hadronically-decaying tau leptons. The green, blue and red tracks inside the cone are identified as originating from three charged pions consistent with the visible decays of the tau lepton. Their transverse momenta are 14.6 GeV, 5.5 GeV and 4.2 GeV. The energy deposits in yellow inside the white cone are the most energetic clusters of cells in the event. On the bottom part of the detector, a single isolated track (shown in orange) is detected by the Inner Detector and the Muon Spectrometer, consistent with an isolated muon from a leptonically decaying tau lepton. JiveXML_428648_633647719-RZ.png
Event display (Run 428580, Event 612079972) of a collision event containing a dilepton ttbar candidate recorded in ATLAS on 18 July 2022 when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV per beam were delivered by the LHC. The figure shows a 3D view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the point where the two beams of protons from the LHC collide, the figure shows the tracks of charged particles as they are reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks), an electron track (green line), a muon track (red line) as well as the energy deposits in the LAr (green and cyan blocks for the barrel and endcap respectively) and Tile (yellow/orange blocks) calorimeters. Muon chambers associated with the muon track are shown in green (MDT endcap) and purple (TGC) boxes. The event contains two jets that have passed b-tagging requirements and these are delineated with cyan cones. The lower-left-hand view shows a projection of the same event onto the transverse plane, showing in addition the hits in the barrel of the Pixel (white) and SCT (yellow) detectors, as well as the direction of the missing transverse momentum (dashed white line). event_display_ttbar_428580_612079972_2.png
Event display (Run 427394, Event 2167971) of a collision event containing a J/ѱ to e+ e- candidate recorded in ATLAS on 5 July 2022, when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS for the first time by the LHC. The figure shows a 3D view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the point where the two beams of protons from the LHC collide, the figure shows the tracks of charged particles as they are reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks), two electron tracks (green lines), as well as the energy deposits in the electromagnetic (green boxes) and hadronic (yellow/orange boxes) calorimeters. The upper-left-hand view shows a projection of the same event onto the transverse plane, showing in addition the hits in the barrel of the Pixel (white), SCT (yellow), and TRT (white/red) detectors. Jpsiee_candidate_Run427394_Evt2167971.png
Event display (Run 427514, Event 68319093) of a collision event recorded in ATLAS on 7 July 2022, when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV were delivered to ATLAS by the LHC. The red line shows a muon candidate with transverse momentum of 15 GeV reconstructed using information from the inner tracking detectors and the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer end-cap. The muon candidate was among the first reconstructed using hits in the Micromegas (MM) chambers of the New Small Wheel (NSW) on side C. The NSW, installed during the long shutdown between Runs 2 and 3, is outlined in white and the MM hits are shown as orange lines. Additional muon chambers associated with the track are shown as green (MDT endcap) and purple (TGC endcap) boxes. Also shown in the figure are the tracks of charged particles as they are reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks), as well as the energy deposits in the electromagnetic (green boxes) and hadronic (yellow/orange boxes) calorimeters. The bottom-left view is a projection of the same event onto the transverse plane, showing in addition the hits in the TRT detector in white (red) for hits (high-threshold hits). ATLAS_VP1_NSW_MMhits_run427514_evt68319093_2022-07-07T04-33-49.png
Event display of a collision event (Run 427394, Event 10631430) containing a Z to e+ e- candidate recorded in ATLAS on 5 July 2022, when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS for the first time by the LHC. The figure shows a 3D view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the point where the two beams of protons from the LHC collide, the figure shows the tracks of charged particles as they are reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks), two electron tracks (green lines), as well as the energy deposits in the electromagnetic (green boxes) calorimeter. The right-hand view shows a projection of the same event onto the transverse plane, showing the objects described above, as well as the hits in the Pixel (white), SCT (yellow), and TRT (white/red) detectors. Also shown are the energy deposits in the electromagnetic (green boxes) calorimeter. event_display_Zee_Run_427394_Event10631430_5Jul2022.png
Event display of a collision event (Run 427394, Event 21060879) containing a Z to µ+ µ- candidate recorded in ATLAS on 5 July 2022, when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS for the first time by the LHC. The figure shows a 3D view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the point where the two beams of protons from the LHC collide, the figure shows the tracks of charged particles as they are reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks), the energy deposits in the electromagnetic (green boxes) and hadronic (yellow/orange boxes) calorimeters, and in the muon spectrometer (red tracks) together with the muon chambers associated with them (blue/green/purple) boxes. The left-hand view shows a projection of the same event onto the transverse plane, showing the tracks of charged particles reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks), and in the muon spectrometer (red tracks). Also shown are the hits in the Pixel (white), SCT (yellow), and TRT (white/red) detectors, as well as energy deposits in the electromagnetic (green boxes) and hadronic (yellow boxes) calorimeters. Zmumu_candidate_Run427394_Evt3606971.png
Event display of a collision event (Run 427394, Event 3606971) containing a J/ѱ to µ+ µ- candidate recorded in ATLAS on 5 July 2022, when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS for the first time by the LHC. The figure shows a 3D view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the point where the two beams of protons from the LHC collide, the figure shows the tracks of charged particles as they are reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks), the energy deposits in the electromagnetic (green boxes) and hadronic (yellow/orange boxes) calorimeters, and the muon tracks (red tracks) together with the muon chambers associated with them (green/purple) boxes. The top-left view shows a projection of the same event onto the transverse plane, showing the tracks of charged particles reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks), and the muon tracks (red tracks). Also shown are the hits in the Pixel (white), SCT (yellow), and TRT (white/red) detectors. Jpsimumu_candidate_Run427394_Evt3606971_v2.png
Event display of a collision event (Run 427394, Event 3038977) recorded in ATLAS on 5 July 2022, when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS for the first time by the LHC. The figure on the left shows an axial view of the ATLAS detector. The figure on the right shows the energy deposits in the cells of the ATLAS calorimeters. The figure at the bottom shows a side view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the center of the ATLAS detector, the hits and reconstructed tracks of the charged particles in the Inner Detector are shown as dots and colored lines, respectively. The energy deposits in the electromagnetic (the green layer) and hadronic (the red layer) calorimeters are shown as yellow boxes, as well as red and green bars. The hits in the Muon Spectrometer (the outer blue layer) are shown as red and yellow blocks. JiveXML_427394_3038977-InDetEnhanced.png
Event display of a collision event (Run 427394, Event 3038977) recorded in ATLAS on 5 July 2022, when stable beams of protons at the energy of 6.8 TeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS for the first time by the LHC. The bottom-right figure shows a 3D view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the point where the two beams of protons from the LHC collide, the figure shows the tracks of charged particles as they are reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks), the energy deposits in the electromagnetic (green boxes) and hadronic (yellow boxes) calorimeters, as well as the reconstructed particle jets (yellow cones). The barrel magnet and the muon chambers in the barrel region of the detector (blue boxes) are shown as a semi-transparent cut-out. At the center, the picture shows the beam pipe, where the protons accelerated by the LHC enter the detector. The top-left view shows a projection of the same event on the transverse plane, showing the tracks of charged particles reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks) and the energy deposits in the electromagnetic (green boxes) and hadronic (yellow boxes) calorimeters, as well as the reconstructed particle jets (yellow cones). The top figure shows a close-up view of the inner detector; starting from the center, it shows the hits in the Pixel (white), SCT (yellow), and TRT (white/red) detectors, as well as the reconstructed tracks (orange) of charged particles. ATLAS_VP1_136TeV_run427394_evt3038977_2022-07-05T17-02-31_v5.png

Heavy-ion test run November 2022

Event display (Run 440101, Event 823635) of a heavy ion collision event recorded in ATLAS on 18 Nov 2022, when stable beams of lead ions colliding at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.36 TeV were delivered to ATLAS by the LHC. The figure shows a 3D view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the point where the two beams of lead ions from the LHC collide, the figure shows the tracks of charged particles as they are reconstructed in the inner detector (orange tracks), the energy deposits in the LAr (green/teal boxes) and Tile (yellow/orange boxes) calorimeters, and the track reconstructed in the muon spectrometer (red track) together with the associated muon chambers (green/purple boxes). The right-hand view shows a projection of the same event onto the transverse plane. ATLAS_VP1_HeavyIons_run440101_evt823635_2022-11-18T16-45-12_v3.png
Event display (Run 440101, Event 823635) of a heavy ion collision event recorded in ATLAS on 18 Nov 2022, when stable beams of lead ions colliding at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.36 TeV were delivered to ATLAS by the LHC. The figure is a 3D visualization of real experimental data collected and reconstructed by the ATLAS detector. The image shows a cut out of the inner part of the ATLAS detector, with the beam pipe and the four layers of the Pixel tracking detector. In this event, lead ions accelerated in the LHC meet in a central collision at the place where the single reconstructed vertex is shown (blue sphere). From the collision, a large number of particles are produced; the tracks of the charged particles are reconstructed by the ATLAS tracking detectors and are shown here (orange lines). In this particular event, nearly five thousand tracks were generated from the single vertex and have been reconstructed; in the visualization, about three thousand tracks are visible, having applied a cut on the phi angle to better show the vertex. ATLAS_VP1_HeavyIons_run440101_evt823635_2022-11-18_lots_of_tracks.png
Event display (Run 440101, Event 823635) of a heavy ion collision event recorded in ATLAS on 18 Nov 2022, when stable beams of lead ions colliding at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 5.36 TeV were delivered to ATLAS by the LHC. The figure on the left shows an axial view of the ATLAS detector. The figure on the right shows the energy deposits in the cells of the ATLAS calorimeter. The figure at the bottom shows a side view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the centre of the ATLAS detector, the reconstructed tracks of the charged particles in the inner detector are shown as colored lines. The energy deposits in the electromagnetic (the green layer) and hadronic (the red layer) calorimeters are shown as yellow boxes. The hits in the muon spectrometer (the outer blue layer) are shown as red and grey blocks. A reconstructed candidate muon track is indicated by the cyan line in the muon spectrometer. JiveXML_440101_823635.png

Beam splashes and 450 GeV beam runs, including early collisions, spring 2022

Event display (Run 423110, Event 789870) of a collision event recorded in ATLAS on 28 May 2022, when stable beams of protons at the injection energy of 450 GeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS by the LHC. The red line shows a muon candidate reconstructed using information from the inner tracking detectors and three stations of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer end-cap. The muon candidate was reconstructed using hits in the Micromegas chambers of the New Small Wheel on side A. A side view of the event is shown in the lower part of the image. The New Small Wheels are shown together with the MDT chambers (green) used to reconstruct the muon trajectory.

ATLAS_VP1_NSW_MMhitsOnTrack_run423110_evt789870_2022-05-28T11-02-50.png
Event display (Run 423803, Event 3826924) of an event recorded in ATLAS on 2 June 2022, when proton beams at the injection energy of 450 GeV per beam were delivered from the LHC, scraping nearby collimators and producing muons that passed horizontally through the ATLAS detector. The figures at the top show representations of the New Small Wheels of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with hits in red and yellow. On the top left the Small-Strip Thin-Gap chambers (sTGC) on ATLAS side C are displayed. The top center plot shows correspondingly the sTGC chambers on side A. The top right view displays the Micromegas chambers on side A. The figure on the bottom left shows a side view of the ATLAS detector and the figure on the bottom right an axial view. The energy deposits in the hadronic calorimeters (red layer) are shown as yellow boxes. The hits in the Muon Spectrometer (outer blue layer) are shown as red and yellow blocks. Reconstructed track segments are shown as green lines. JiveXML_423803_3826924-RZ-YX-YX-YX-YX-2022-06-15-18-10-12.png
Event display of a collision event (Run 423110, Event 184635) recorded in ATLAS on 28 May 2022, when stable beams of protons at the injection energy of 450 GeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS by the LHC. The figure on the left shows an axial view of the ATLAS detector. The figure on the right shows the energy deposits in the cells of the ATLAS calorimeter. The figure at the bottom shows a side view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the center of the ATLAS detector, the hits and reconstructed tracks of the charged particles in the Inner Detector are shown as dots and colored lines, respectively. The energy deposits in the electromagnetic (the green layer) and hadronic (the red layer) calorimeters are shown as yellow boxes. The hits in the Muon Spectrometer (the outer blue layer) are shown as red and gray blocks. JiveXML_423110_184635.png
Event display of a collision event (Run 423110, Event 184635) recorded in ATLAS on 28 May 2022, when stable beams of protons at the injection energy of 450 GeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS by the LHC. The view on the left shows a cut-out view of the ATLAS detector: from the interaction point, the orange lines represent reconstructed tracks, the green and yellow boxes show energy deposits in the electromagnetic (EMB and EMEC) and hadronic (Tile) calorimeters, respectively, and the teal blocks show energy deposits in the hadronic endcap calorimeter (HEC). The top right inset shows a projection of the reconstructed tracks on the transverse plane of the detector. The orange lines represent reconstructed tracks, the pink dots in the center show the measurements from the Pixel detector, the yellow boxes visualize the measurements from the SCT, and the white dots in the gray annulus represent measurements in the TRT. The energy deposits in the cells of the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters are shown in the green and yellow boxes respectively. ATLAS_event_display_VP1_900GeV_SBCollisions_run423110_evt184635_2022-05-28T09-52-49.png
Event display of a collision event (Run 423110, Event 184635) recorded in ATLAS on 28 May 2022, when stable beams of protons at the injection energy of 450 GeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS by the LHC. The view in the center shows a cut-out view of the ATLAS detector: from the interaction point, the orange lines represent reconstructed tracks, the green and yellow boxes show energy deposits in the electromagnetic (EMB and EMEC) and hadronic (Tile) calorimeters respectively, the teal blocks show energy deposits in the hadronic endcap calorimeter, the semi-transparent blue boxes show measurements in the barrel muon chambers, and the green and purple boxes show measurements in the endcap muon chambers. The lower left inset shows a projection of the reconstructed tracks on the transverse plane of the detector. The orange lines represent reconstructed tracks, the pink dots in the center show the measurements from the Pixel detector, the yellow boxes visualize the measurements from the SCT, and the white dots in the gray annulus represent measurements in the TRT. The energy deposits in the cells of the electromagnetic (EMB and EMEC) and hadronic (Tile) calorimeters are shown in the green and yellow boxes respectively. ATLAS_event_display_VP1_900GeV_SBCollisions_run423110_evt184635_2022-05-28T09-52-49_v2.png
Event display of a collision event (Run 423110, Event 183777) recorded in ATLAS on 28 May 2022, when stable beams of protons at the injection energy of 450 GeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS by the LHC. The figure on the left shows an axial view of the ATLAS detector. The figure on the right shows the energy deposits in the cells of the ATLAS calorimeter. The figure at the bottom shows a side view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the center of the ATLAS detector, the hits and reconstructed tracks of the charged particles in the Inner Detector are shown as dots and colored lines, respectively. The energy deposits in the electromagnetic (the green layer) and hadronic (the red layer) calorimeters are shown as yellow boxes. The hits in the Muon Spectrometer (the outer blue layer) are shown as red, gray and cyan blocks. A reconstructed candidate muon track is indicated by the cyan line in the Muon Spectrometer. JiveXML_423110_183777.png
Event display of a collision event (Run 423110, Event 183777) recorded in ATLAS on 28 May 2022, when stable beams of protons at the injection energy of 450 GeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS by the LHC. The figure on the right shows a cut-out view of the ATLAS detector: from the interaction point, the orange lines represent tracks of charged particles reconstructed in the inner detector, the yellow blocks show energy deposits in the hadronic calorimeter, the teal blocks visualize energy deposits in the hadronic endcap calorimeter, the semi-transparent blue boxes are the barrel muon chambers, the red line represents the track of a muon reconstructed from measurements in the MDT (orange lines) and RPC (green lines) sub-detectors; the purple lines visualize other RPC hits. The figure in the lower left inset shows a side view of the ATLAS detector. Starting from the center of the detector, the orange lines represent tracks from charged particles reconstructed in the inner detector, the yellow blocks show energy deposits in the hadronic calorimeter (Tile), the teal blocks visualize energy deposits in the hadronic endcap calorimeter (HEC), the semi-transparent blue boxes are the muon chambers, the purple lines represent the muon track reconstructed from measurements in the MDT (orange/red lines) and RPC (purple lines) sub-detectors, and the green and purple boxes show measurements in the endcap muon chambers. ATLAS_event_display_VP1_900GeV_SBCollisions_run423110_evt18377_2022-05028T09-52-08_v4.png
Event display of a splash event recorded by ATLAS during the LHC "beam splash" tests on Saturday 07 May 2022 as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3 data taking. In the beam splash tests, a single bunch of protons from the LHC hits a collimator placed in the beamline 140m in front of the ATLAS interaction point, thereby generating a large number of particles, which are then used to probe the correct operation of the ATLAS detector as a whole. Single bunches can hit the collimator in successive rotations in the LHC ring with decreasing intensities in each pass. This display (Run 420624, Event 556109) comes from the second pass of the bunch in the LHC ring. In this event display, the spray of particles enters ATLAS from the right hand side of the picture (the "A-Side" of the detector) travelling to the left (the "C-Side"). From the centre of the detector moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the TRT detector (red and white), the LAr (different hues of green) and Tile (yellow) calorimeters, MDT (blue), RPC (purple) and TGC (white) muon detectors, respectively. The orange lines in the two inlets on the right show the reconstructed muon segments. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “C-Side” of the detector. ATLAS_VP1_run420624_evt556109_2022-05-07T06-59-15_v2.png
Event display of a splash event recorded by ATLAS during the LHC "beam splash" tests on Saturday 07 May 2022 as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3 data taking. In the beam splash tests, a single bunch of protons from the LHC hits a collimator placed in the beamline 140m in front of the ATLAS interaction point, thereby generating a large number of particles, which are then used to probe the correct operation of the ATLAS detector as a whole. Single bunches can hit the collimator in successive rotations in the LHC ring with decreasing intensities in each pass. This display (Run 420624, Event 556109) comes from the second pass of the bunch in the LHC ring. In this event display, the spray of particles enters ATLAS from the left hand side of the picture (the "A-Side" of the detector) travelling to the right (the "C-Side"). From the centre of the detector moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the TRT detector (red and white), the LAr (different hues of green) and Tile (yellow) calorimeters, MDT (blue) and RPC (purple) muon detectors, respectively. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “C-Side” of the detector. ATLAS_VP1_run420624_evt556109_2022-05-07T06-59-15.png
Event display of a splash event recorded by ATLAS during the LHC "beam splash" tests on Saturday 07 May 2022 as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3 data taking. In the beam splash tests, a single bunch of protons from the LHC hits a collimator placed in the beamline 140m in front of the ATLAS interaction point, thereby generating a large number of particles, which are then used to probe the correct operation of the ATLAS detector as a whole. Single bunches can hit the collimator in successive rotations in the LHC ring with decreasing intensities in each pass. This display (Run 420624, Event 556108) comes from the first pass of the bunch in the LHC ring. In this event display, the spray of particles enters ATLAS from the right hand side of the picture (the "A-Side" of the detector) travelling to the left (the "C-Side"). From the centre of the detector moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the TRT detector (red and white), the LAr (different hues of green) and Tile (yellow) calorimeters, MDT (blue), RPC (purple) and TGC (white) muon detectors, respectively. The orange lines in the two inlets on the right show the reconstructed muon segments. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “C-Side” of the detector. ATLAS_VP1_run420624_evt556108_2022-05-07T06-59-15_v2.png
Event display of a splash event recorded by ATLAS during the LHC "beam splash" tests on Saturday 07 May 2022 as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3 data taking. In the beam splash tests, a single bunch of protons from the LHC hits a collimator placed in the beamline 140m in front of the ATLAS interaction point, thereby generating a large number of particles, which are then used to probe the correct operation of the ATLAS detector as a whole. Single bunches can hit the collimator in successive rotations in the LHC ring with decreasing intensities in each pass. This display (Run 420624, Event 556108) comes from the first pass of the bunch in the LHC ring. In this event display, the spray of particles enters ATLAS from the left hand side of the picture (the "A-Side" of the detector) travelling to the right (the "C-Side"). From the centre of the detector moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the TRT detector (red and white), the LAr (different hues of green) and Tile (yellow) calorimeters, MDT (blue) and RPC (purple) muon detectors, respectively. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “C-Side” of the detector. ATLAS_VP1_run420624_evt556108_2022-05-07T06-59-15.png
Event display of a splash event recorded by ATLAS during the LHC "beam splash" tests on Saturday 07 May 2022 as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3 data taking. In the beam splash tests, a single bunch of protons from the LHC hits a collimator placed in the beamline 140m in front of the ATLAS interaction point, thereby generating a large number of particles, which are then used to probe the correct operation of the ATLAS detector as a whole. Single bunches can hit the collimator in successive rotations in the LHC ring with decreasing intensities in each pass. This display (Run 420624, Event 556109) comes from the second pass of the bunch in the LHC ring. The spray of particles enters ATLAS from the right hand side of the picture (the "A-Side" of the detector) travelling to the left (the "C-Side"). The figure on the left shows an axial view of the ATLAS detector. The figure on the right shows the energy deposits in the cells of the ATLAS calorimeter. The figure at the bottom shows a side view of the ATLAS detector. From the centre of the detector moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the TRT detector, in the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, and in the muon detectors, respectively. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “C-Side” of the detector. JiveXML_420624_556109.png
Event display of a splash event recorded by ATLAS during the LHC "beam splash" tests on Saturday 07 May 2022 as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3 data taking. In the beam splash tests, a single bunch of protons from the LHC hits a collimator placed in the beamline 140m in front of the ATLAS interaction point, thereby generating a large number of particles, which are then used to probe the correct operation of the ATLAS detector as a whole. Single bunches can hit the collimator in successive rotations in the LHC ring with decreasing intensities in each pass. This display (Run 420624, Event 556108) comes from the first pass of the bunch in the LHC ring. The spray of particles enters ATLAS from the right hand side of the picture (the "A-Side" of the detector) travelling to the left (the "C-Side"). The figure on the left shows an axial view of the ATLAS detector. The figure on the right shows the energy deposits in the cells of the ATLAS calorimeter. The figure at the bottom shows a side view of the ATLAS detector. From the centre of the detector moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the TRT detector, in the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, and in the muon detectors, respectively. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “C-Side” of the detector. JiveXML_420624_556108.png

Event display of a splash event recorded by ATLAS during the LHC "beam splash" tests on Thursday 28 April 2022 as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3 data taking. In the beam splash tests, a single proton beam from the LHC hits a collimator placed in the beamline before the ATLAS detector. In this event display (Run 419373, Event 611639), the spray of particles enters ATLAS from the right hand side of the picture (the "A-Side" of the detector) travelling to the left (the "C-Side"). The figure on the left shows an axial view of the ATLAS detector. The figure on the right shows the energy deposits in the cells of the ATLAS calorimeter. The figure at the bottom shows a side view of the ATLAS detector. From the centre of the detector moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the TRT detector, in the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, and in the muon detectors, respectively. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “C-Side” of the detector. JiveXML_419373_611639.png
Event display of a splash event recorded by ATLAS during the LHC "beam splash" tests on Thursday 28 April 2022 as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3 data taking. In the beam splash tests, a single proton beam from the LHC hits a collimator placed in the beamline before the ATLAS detector. In this event display (Run 419373, Event 642936), the spray of particles enters ATLAS from the left hand side of the picture (the "C-Side" of the detector) travelling to the right (the "A-Side"). The figure on the left shows an axial view of the ATLAS detector. The figure on the right shows the energy deposits in the cells of the ATLAS calorimeter. The figure at the bottom shows a side view of the ATLAS detector. From the centre of the detector moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the TRT detector, in the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, and in the muon detectors, respectively. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “A-Side” of the detector. JiveXML_419373_642936.png
On Friday 22 April 2022, the first events from the LHC "beam splash" tests were recorded by the ATLAS experiment as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3. During the beam splash tests, a single proton beam from the LHC hits a collimator placed in the beamline before the ATLAS detector. In this event display (Run 418554, Event 188446), the spray of particles enters ATLAS from the left hand side of the picture (the "C-Side" of the detector) travelling to the right (the "A-Side"). The figure on the left shows an axial view of the ATLAS detector. The figure on the right shows the energy deposits in the cells of the ATLAS calorimeter. The figure at the bottom shows a side view of the ATLAS detector. From the centre of the detector moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the TRT detector, in the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, and in the muon detectors, respectively. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “A-Side” of the detector. JiveXML_418554_188446.png
On Friday 22 April 2022, the first events from the LHC "beam splash" tests were recorded by the ATLAS experiment as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3. During the beam splash tests, a single proton beam from the LHC hits a collimator placed in the beamline before the ATLAS detector. In this event display (Run 418554, Event 188446), the spray of particles enters ATLAS from the left hand side of the picture (the "C-Side" of the detector) travelling to the right (the "A-Side"). From the centre of the detector moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the TRT detector (red and white), in the electromagnetic (different hues of green) and hadronic (yellow and orange) calorimeters, respectively. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “A-Side” of the detector. ATLAS_VP1_BeamSplash_Run3Restart_22Apr2022_v2.png

Beam splashes and 450 GeV Test Collisions fall 2021

On Tuesday 19 Oct 2021, the first events from the LHC "beam splash" tests were recorded by ATLAS. These tests are the first observations of particle collisions as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3, and are used by the experiments to check that all instruments, workflows, machines, and software run as expected. During such beam splash tests, the particle beam accelerated by the LHC is focused on a fixed target placed in the beamline before the detector, and the particles created in the interaction move on, along the beamline and outwards. They pass through many layers of particle detectors, interact with them and leave some amount of their energy. In the image, a cutout view of the ATLAS detector is shown. The pipe at the centre is the beampipe, conveying accelerated particles from the LHC; in this particular event, a single proton test beam from the LHC (known as “beam 1”) is coming into the ATLAS detector, from the left of the picture (which shows the so-called "A-Side" of the detector) and travelling to the right (showing the "C-Side"). The red/white stripes are used to visualise the particle-matter interactions in the inner layers (here showing the interaction with the TRT, which is part of the inner tracking detectors); green boxes show the energy deposits in the LAr calorimeters, which are specially built concentric to the beamline to interact with electrons and photons and also in the forward regions to interact with hadrons; and yellow boxes visualise energy deposits in the TileCal hadronic calorimeter conceived to detect hadrons. The blue boxes surrounding the central part of the image are part of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, and they are shown here for context. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “C-Side” of the detector (in particular, the “L1_EM20C”). By looking at images like this one, ATLAS physicists can check that all the sub-detectors are working and confirm the validity of the data taking. This is an important step in testing the whole data workflow, in anticipation of stable beams with proton collisions. ATLAS_VP1_event_display_6_run404473_evt50594_2021-10-19T21-24-06.png
On Tuesday 19 Oct 2021, the first events from the LHC "beam splash" tests were recorded by ATLAS. These tests are the first observations of particle collisions as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3, and are used by the experiments to check that all instruments, workflows, machines, and software run as expected. During such beam splash tests, the particle beam accelerated by the LHC is focused on a fixed target placed in the beamline before the detector, and the particles created in the interaction move on, along the beamline and outwards. They pass through many layers of particle detectors, interact with them and leave some amount of their energy. In the image, a cutout view of the ATLAS detector is shown. The pipe at the centre is the beampipe, conveying accelerated particles from the LHC; in this particular event, a single proton test beam from the LHC (known as “beam 1”) is coming into the ATLAS detector, from the left of the picture (which shows the so-called "A-Side" of the detector) and travelling to the right (showing the "C-Side"). The red/white stripes are used to visualise the particle-matter interaction in the inner layers (here showing the interaction with the TRT, which is part of the inner tracking detectors); green boxes show the energy deposits in the LAr calorimeters, which are specially built concentric to the beamline to interact with electrons and photons, and also in the forward regions to interact with hadrons; and yellow boxes visualise energy deposits in the TileCal hadronic calorimeter conceived to detect hadrons. The orange stripes surrounding the inner part of the detector show energy deposits in the MDT chambers; these chambers are part of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, the system dedicated to the detection and measurement of muons. The image also shows the barrel toroid, the large black toroidal structure surrounding the detector in the central region, and the two “barrel end-caps”: as part of the ATLAS magnets, they provide the main magnetic field needed to bend the particles, to measure their momentum. The large wheel-shaped grey frame is part of the supporting structures for the muon chambers and is shown here for context. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “C-Side” of the detector (in particular, the “L1_EM20C”). By looking at images like this one, ATLAS physicists can check that all the sub-detectors are working well and confirm the validity of the data taking. This is an important step in testing the whole data workflow, in anticipation of stable beams with proton collisions. ATLAS_VP1_event_display_7_run404473_evt50594_withMuonMDTHits_v4.png
On Tuesday 19 Oct 2021, the first events from the LHC "beam splash" tests were recorded by ATLAS. These tests are the first observations of particle collisions as the LHC restarts in preparation for Run 3, and are used by the experiments to check that all instruments, workflows, machines, and software run as expected. During such beam splash tests, the particle beam accelerated by the LHC is focused on a fixed target placed in the beamline before the detector, and the particles created in the interaction move on, along the beamline and outwards. They pass through many layers of particle detectors, interact with them and leave some amount of their energy. In this particular event, as shown in the bottom left picture, a single proton test beam from LHC (known as “beam 1”) is coming into the ATLAS detector from the right of the picture (the so called "A-Side" of the detector) travelling to the left (the "C-Side"). In the image, the yellow boxes show energy deposits in all layers of the ATLAS detector. From the centre moving outwards, the image shows particle interactions in the inner tracking detectors, in the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, and in the muon detectors, respectively. The data visualised in the picture have been recorded using a threshold-based data filter (the “trigger”) based on energy deposits in the electromagnetic calorimeter on the “C-Side” of the detector (in particular, the “L1_EM20C”). By looking at images like this one, ATLAS physicists can check that all the sub-detectors are working well and confirm the validity of the data taking. This is an important step in testing the whole data workflow, in anticipation of stable beams with proton collisions. JiveXML_404473_50594.png
During "beam splash" tests, particle bunches accelerated in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are directed towards a fixed target, thereby generating a large number of particles, which are then used to probe the correct operation of the ATLAS detector as a whole. In this display, a single bunch hit the fixed target three times in a row, each time making another turn in the LHC ring on 19 October 2021. The image shows the energy deposited from the interaction of the particles generated in the three subsequent "beam splash" events. For each event, the LHC turn number and two views are provided: a transversal view (on the left of each row) and a cut-out view of the ATLAS detector (on the right). The view on the left shows the energy deposits in the barrel electromagnetic calorimeter (shown as green boxes) and in the barrel and endcap hadronic calorimeter (shown as yellow boxes). The view on the right shows a cut-out 3D view of the ATLAS detector, focusing on the areas of the inner tracking detectors and the calorimeters. The pipe at the centre is the beampipe, conveying accelerated particles from the LHC. The red/white rings visualise the particle-matter interaction in the inner layers (here showing the interaction with the TRT, which is part of the inner tracking detectors); green boxes show the energy deposits in the LAr calorimeters, which are specially built concentric to the beamline to interact with electrons and photons, and also in the forward regions to interact with hadrons; and yellow boxes visualise energy deposits in the TileCal hadronic calorimeter conceived to detect hadrons. The three visualisations clearly show the decrease of the amount of energy generated by the each "beam splash" and deposited into the ATLAS detector at each turn of the single proton bunch in the LHC ring.

ATLAS_VP1_ThreeEventsSameSplash_1_v2.png
Event display of a test collision event recorded in ATLAS on 29 October 2021, when stable beams of protons at the injection energy of 450 GeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS during the LHC pilot beam test. Starting from the center of the ATLAS detector, the hits and reconstructed tracks of the charged particles in the Inner Detector are shown as dots and colored lines, respectively. The energy deposits in the LAr calorimeter (the green layer) and Tile calorimeter (the red layer) are shown as yellow boxes. The reconstructed track segments and their associated hits in the Muon Spectrometer (the outer blue layer) are shown as green lines and yellow blocks, respectively.

JiveXML_405396_13447194_ADC80_InDetHits.png
Event display of a test collision event recorded in ATLAS on 29 October 2021, when stable beams of protons at the injection energy of 450 GeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS during the LHC pilot beam test. The view on the right shows a cut-out view of the ATLAS detector: from the center, the orange lines represent reconstructed tracks, and the green and yellow boxes show energy deposits in the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters, respectively. The top left inset shows a projection of the reconstructed tracks on the transversal plane of the detector, with the energy deposits in the cells of the electromagnetic calorimeter (barrel and endcap areas) and the barrel hadronic calorimeter. The bottom left inset shows a detailed view of the reconstructed tracks and hits from the inner tracking detectors; starting from the center, the four layers of white dots represent measurements from the Pixel detector; the yellow lines and boxes visualize the measurements from the SCT detector; the white, red, and orange dots contained in the annulus grey area represent the measurements from the TRT detector, with the orange being the measurements associated with the reconstructed tracks.

event_display_r405396_ev13447194_v4_a.png
Event display of a test collision event recorded in ATLAS on 29 October 2021, when stable beams of protons at the injection energy of 450 GeV per beam were delivered to ATLAS during the LHC pilot beam test. The view on the left shows a cut-out view of the ATLAS detector: from the center, the orange lines represent reconstructed tracks; the green and yellow boxes show energy deposits in the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters respectively; the purple tracklets visualize the passage of a muon through the barrel and endcap muon chambers, represented as blue and green boxes respectively. The top right inset shows a projection of the reconstructed tracks on the transversal plane of the detector, with the energy deposits in the cells of the electromagnetic calorimeter (barrel and endcap areas) and the barrel hadronic calorimeter. The bottom right inset shows a detailed view of the reconstructed tracks and hits from the inner tracking detectors; starting from the center, the four layers of white dots represent measurements from the Pixel detector; the yellow lines and boxes visualize the measurements from the SCT detector; the white, red, and orange dots contained in the annulus grey area represent the measurements from the TRT detector, with the orange being the measurements associated with the reconstructed tracks.

event_display_r405396_ev13447194_v4_b.png


Major updates:
-- ManuellaVincter - 2021-10-23

Responsible: ManuellaVincter
Subject: public

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Topic revision: r22 - 2022-11-21 - ManuellaVincter
 
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