EPS-HEP 2019

Abstracts

The Higgs self-coupling at CLIC

  • Speakers: Ulrike Schnoor (CERN)
  • Status: Accepted as parallel talk
  • Track: Higgs Physics
  • Abstract: The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a mature option for a future electron-positron collider operating at centre-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. CLIC will be built and operated in a staged approach with three centre-of-mass energy stages currently assumed to be 380 GeV, 1.5 TeV, and 3 TeV. The Higgs self-coupling is of particular interest: for determining the shape of the Higgs potential, and due to its sensitivity to a variety of BSM physics scenarios. At the higher-energy stages CLIC will produce Higgs boson pairs both via double Higgsstrahlung and via vector-boson fusion. Recent results will be presented showing that measurements of these processes lead to a determination of the Higgs self-coupling with a precision of around 10%.
  • Slides

The CLIC potential for new physics

  • Speakers: Aidan Robson (Glasgow University)
  • Status: Accepted as parallel talk
  • Track: Searches for New Physics
  • Abstract: The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a mature option for a future electron-positron collider operating at centre-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. CLIC will be built and operated in a staged approach with three centre-of-mass energy stages currently assumed to be 380 GeV, 1.5 TeV, and 3 TeV. A selection of results from recent studies will be presented showing that CLIC has excellent sensitivity to many BSM physics scenarios, both through direct observation and precision measurements of SM processes. New particles can be discovered in a model-independent way almost up to the kinematic limit. Compared with hadron colliders, the low background conditions at CLIC provide extended discovery potential. In addition to studying new particles directly, BSM models can be probed up to scales of tens of TeV through precision measurements. Beam polarisation allows further constraints on the underlying theory in many cases.
  • Slides

Top-quark physics at CLIC

  • Speakers: Filip Aleksander Zarnecki (Warsaw University)
  • Status: Accepted as parallel talk
  • Track: Top and Electroweak Physics
  • Abstract: The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a mature option for a future electron-positron collider operating at centre-of-mass energies of up to 3 TeV. CLIC will be built and operated in a staged approach with three centre-of-mass energy stages currently assumed to be 380 GeV, 1.5 TeV, and 3 TeV. This contribution discusses the prospects for precision measurements of top-quark production and properties at CLIC, including a top-quark mass measurement with a precision of around 50 MeV, top-quark couplings to the electroweak gauge bosons, forward-backward and polarisation asymmetries, the top Yukawa coupling and CP properties in the ttH coupling, and top-quark pair production through vector-boson fusion. At the high-energy stages new studies have been undertaken using jet-substructure techniques originally developed for the LHC, and the BSM sensitivity provided by the top physics program at CLIC is illustrated using Effective Field Theory (EFT) approaches.
  • Slides

The CLIC detector

  • Speakers: Emilia Leogrande (CERN)
  • Status: Accepted as poster
  • Track: Detector R&D and Data Handling
  • Abstract: The proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) will provide electron-positron collisions at centre-of-mass energies from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. CLIC offers a rich precision physics program, and a high sensitivity to a wide range of possible new phenomena. The precision required for such measurements and the specific conditions imposed by the CLIC beam structure put strict requirements on the detector design and technology developments. This includes ultra-low mass vertexing and tracking systems with small cells, highly granular imaging calorimeters, and a precise hit-timing resolution for all subsystems. Ambitious R&D programs for silicon tracking detectors and calorimeters are being pursued, addressing the challenging detector requirements with innovative new technologies. A variety of detector optimisation studies have been carried out to establish the overall detector performance and to assess the impact of different technology options. This contribution reviews the CLIC detector concept, presents the detector performance achieved in full-detector simulations, and gives an overview of the ongoing hardware R&D.
  • Poster
Topic attachments
I Attachment History Action Size Date Who Comment
PDFpdf CLICdet_poster_EPS.pdf r1 manage 28883.6 K 2019-07-25 - 15:50 EricaBrondolin  
PDFpdf UlrikeSchnoor_EPS2019_DiHiggsCLIC.pdf r1 manage 6220.1 K 2019-07-25 - 15:50 EricaBrondolin  
PDFpdf aidanrobson_CLICBSM_eps19.pdf r1 manage 27466.5 K 2019-07-30 - 13:32 EricaBrondolin  
PDFpdf zarnecki_top_epshep2019.pdf r1 manage 7769.5 K 2019-07-30 - 13:32 EricaBrondolin  
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Topic revision: r5 - 2019-09-12 - EmiliaLeogrande
 
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