European Particle Physics Strategy Update 2020 Press Release

19 June 2020

Official press release

PR03.20 - 19.06.2020

Particle physicists update strategy for the future of the field in Europe

Press release one the CERN webpage.

The original version is included below the corrected version.

English

Following almost two years of discussion and deliberation, the CERN Council today announced that it has updated the strategy that will guide the future of particle physics in Europe within the global particle-physics landscape. Presented during the open part of the Council’s meeting, held remotely due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the recommendations highlight the scientific impact of particle physics, as well as its technological, societal and human capital.

By probing ever-higher energy and thus smaller distance scales, particle physics has made discoveries that have transformed the scientific understanding of the world. Nevertheless, many of the mysteries about the universe, such as the nature of dark matter, and the preponderance of matter over antimatter, are still to be explored. The 2020 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics proposes a vision for both the near- and the long-term future of the field, which maintains Europe's leading role in addressing the outstanding questions in particle physics and in the innovative technologies being developed within the field.

The highest scientific priorities identified in this update are the study of the Higgs boson - a unique particle that raises scientific profound questions about the fundamental laws of nature - and the exploration of the high-energy frontier. These are two crucial and complementary ways to address the open questions in particle physics.

“The Strategy is above all driven by science and thus presents the scientific priorities for the field,” says Ursula Bassler, President of the CERN Council. “The European Strategy Group (ESG) – a special body set up by the Council – successfully led a strategic reflection to which several hundred European physicists contributed.” The scientific vision outlined in the Strategy should serve as a guideline to CERN and facilitate a coherent science policy across Europe.

The successful completion of the High-Luminosity LHC in the coming decade, for which upgrade work is currently in progress at CERN, should remain the focal point of European particle physics. The strategy emphasises the importance of ramping up research and development (R&D) for advanced accelerator, detector and computing technologies, as a necessary prerequisite for all future projects. Delivering the near and long-term future research programme envisaged in this Strategy update requires both focused and transformational R&D, which also has many potential benefits to society.

The document also highlights the need to pursue an electron-positron collider acting as a “Higgs factory” as the highest-priority facility after the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Higgs boson was discovered at CERN in 2012 by scientists working on the LHC, and is expected to be a powerful tool to look for physics beyond the Standard Model. Such a machine would produce copious amounts of Higgs bosons in a very clean environment, would make dramatic progress in mapping the diverse interactions of the Higgs boson with other particles and would form an essential part of a rich research programme, allowing measurements of extremely high precision. Operation of this future collider at CERN could begin within a timescale of less than 10 years after the full exploitation of the High-Luminosity LHC, which is expected to complete operations in 2038.

The exploration of significantly higher energies than the LHC will allow new discoveries to be made and the answers to existing mysteries, such as the nature of dark matter, to potentially be found. In acknowledgement of the fact that the particle physics community is ready to prepare for the next step towards even higher energies and smaller scales, another significant recommendation of the Strategy is that Europe, in collaboration with the worldwide community, should undertake a technical and financial feasibility study for a next-generation hadron collider at the highest achievable energy, with a view to the longer term.

It is further recommended that Europe continue to support neutrino projects in Japan and the US. Cooperation with neighbouring fields is also important, such as astroparticle and nuclear physics, as well as continued collaboration with non-European countries.

“This is a very ambitious strategy, which outlines a bright future for Europe and for CERN with a prudent, step-wise approach. We will continue to invest in strong cooperative programmes between CERN and other research institutes in CERN’s Member States and beyond,” declares CERN Director-General Fabiola Gianotti. “These collaborations are key to sustained scientific and technological progress and bring many societal benefits.”

“The natural next step is to explore the feasibility of the high-priority recommendations, while continuing to pursue a diverse programme of high-impact projects,” explains ESG chair Halina Abramowicz. “Europe should keep the door open to participating in other headline projects that will serve the field as a whole, such as the proposed International Linear Collider project.”

Beyond the immediate scientific return, major research infrastructures such as CERN have broad societal impact, thanks to their technological, economic and human capital. Advances in accelerators, detectors and computing have a significant impact on areas like medical and biomedical technologies, aerospace applications, cultural heritage, artificial intelligence, energy, big data and robotics. Partnerships with large research infrastructures help drive innovation in industry. In terms of human capital, the training of early-career scientists, engineers, technicians and professionals provides a talent pool for industry and other fields of society.

The Strategy also highlights two other essential aspects: the environment and the importance of Open Science. “The environmental impact of particle physics activities should continue to be carefully studied and minimised. A detailed plan for the minimisation of environmental impact and for the saving and reuse of energy should be part of the approval process for any major project,” says the report. The technologies developed in particle physics to minimise the environmental impact of future facilities may also find more general applications in environmental protection.

The update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics announced today got under way in September 2018, when the CERN Council, comprising representatives from CERN’s Member and Associate Member States, established a European Strategy Group (ESG) to coordinate the process. The ESG worked in close consultation with the scientific community. Nearly two hundred submissions were discussed during an Open Symposium in Granada in May 2019 and distilled into the Physics Briefing Book, a scientific summary of the community’s input, prepared by the Physics Preparatory Group. The ESG converged on the final recommendations during a week-long drafting session held in Germany in January 2020. The group’s findings were presented to the CERN Council in March and were scheduled to be announced on 25 May, in Budapest. This was delayed due to the global Covid-19 situation but they have now been made publicly available.

For more information, consult the documents of the Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics:

2020 Update of the European Strategy for Particles Physics Deliberation Document on the 2020 Update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics

French

Après pratiquement deux ans de discussions et de délibérations, le Conseil du CERN a annoncé aujourd'hui qu'il a mis à jour la stratégie qui guidera l'avenir de la physique des particules en Europe dans le contexte mondial de la discipline. Présentées lors de la réunion du Conseil en formation publique, tenue sous forme de visioconférence en raison de la pandémie actuelle de COVID-19, les recommandations énoncées mettent en évidence l'impact scientifique de la physique des particules, ainsi que son capital technologique, sociétal et humain.

Grâce à des énergies toujours plus grandes qui lui permette d’explorer des échelles de distance toujours plus petites, la communauté de la physique des particules a réalisé des découvertes qui ont profondément changé notre connaissance scientifique du monde qui nous entoure. Néanmoins, nombre des mystères concernant l’Univers, comme la nature de la matière noire et la prédominance de la matière sur l’antimatière, restent à élucider. La mise à jour 2020 de la stratégie européenne pour la physique des particules propose une perspective à court et à long termes de la discipline, maintenant l'Europe à l’avant-garde des recherches sur les questions en suspens de la physique des particules, ainsi que des innovations technologiques développées dans le domaine.

Les priorités scientifiques les plus élevées définies dans cette mise à jour sont l'étude du boson de Higgs – particule unique en son genre qui soulève des questions profondes sur les lois fondamentales de la nature – et l'exploration de la physique à la frontière des hautes énergies. Il s’agit là de deux voies cruciales et complémentaires pour tenter d'élucider les questions encore irrésolues de la physique des particules.

« La stratégie est avant tout guidée par la science et présente ainsi les priorités scientifiques de la discipline, a déclaré Ursula Bassler, présidente du Conseil du CERN. Le Groupe sur la stratégie européenne (ESG) – organe spécialement mis en place par le Conseil – a conduit avec succès une réflexion stratégique à laquelle ont contribué plusieurs centaines de scientifiques européens. » La vision scientifique présentée dans la stratégie doit servir de guide au CERN et faciliter la définition d'une politique scientifique cohérente à l'échelle européenne.

Mener à bien, au cours de la décennie à venir, la transformation du LHC en machine de haute luminosité, dont les travaux sont en cours au CERN, devrait rester l’axe central de la physique des particules en Europe. La stratégie souligne l'importance d'intensifier les activités de recherche et développement (R&D) sur des technologies d'accélérateur, de détecteur et informatiques de pointe, en tant que condition préalable à tout futur projet. Pour mener à bien le programme de recherche à court et long termes envisagé dans cette stratégie mise à jour, il est nécessaire de réaliser des activités de R&D ciblée et propice à des changements en profondeur, présentant également de nombreux bénéfices potentiels pour la société.

Le document souligne également la nécessité de réaliser un collisionneur électron-positon fonctionnant comme « usine à Higgs » en tant qu'installation prioritaire après le Grand collisionneur de hadrons (LHC). Découvert en 2012 au CERN par des scientifiques travaillant sur le LHC, le boson de Higgs promet d'être un outil puissant pour rechercher une physique au-delà du Modèle standard. Le collisionneur électron-positon produirait une grande quantité de bosons de Higgs dans un environnement très limpide, amènerait des progrès considérables dans la cartographie des diverses interactions du boson de Higgs avec d’autres particules et constituerait une part essentielle d’un riche programme de recherche, permettant des mesures d'une extrême précision. L'exploitation au CERN de ce futur collisionneur pourrait commencer dans un délai inférieur à dix ans, après la pleine exploitation du LHC à haute luminosité, qui devrait cesser de fonctionner en 2038.

Grâce à l’exploration d’énergies nettement plus élevées que celles du LHC, de nouvelles découvertes pourront être faites, et des mystères qui demeurent aujourd’hui, comme celui de la nature de la matière noire, pourraient potentiellement être élucidés. La communauté de la physique des particules étant prête à franchir la prochaine étape qui la conduira à des énergies encore plus élevées et à des échelles encore plus petites, la stratégie énonce une autre recommandation importante, selon laquelle l'Europe, en collaboration avec la communauté mondiale, devrait entreprendre une étude de faisabilité technique et financière d'un collisionneur de hadrons de prochaine génération à la plus haute énergie atteignable, dans une perspective à plus long terme.

Il est en outre recommandé que l'Europe continue de soutenir des projets de recherche sur les neutrinos au Japon et aux États-Unis. La coopération avec les disciplines voisines, telles que la physique des astroparticules et la physique nucléaire, est également importante, de même que la poursuite de la collaboration avec les pays non européens.

« Il s'agit d'une stratégie très ambitieuse, qui esquisse un avenir brillant pour l'Europe et le CERN selon une approche prudente et progressive. Nous continuerons à investir dans de vigoureux programmes de coopération entre le CERN et d'autres instituts de recherche situés dans les États membres et au-delà, a déclaré la Directrice générale du CERN, Fabiola Gianotti. Ces collaborations sont essentielles à la réalisation de progrès scientifiques et technologiques durables, et génèrent de nombreuses retombées positives pour la société. »

« La prochaine étape sera évidemment d'étudier la faisabilité des recommandations prioritaires, tout en continuant de mener à bien un programme diversifié de projets susceptibles d'avoir de fortes retombées, a expliqué la Présidente du Groupe sur la stratégie européenne, Halina Abramowicz. L'Europe doit rester disposée à participer à d'autres projets phares qui seront bénéfiques à la discipline dans son ensemble, tels que le projet de Collisionneur linéaire international. »

Au-delà d'un retour scientifique immédiat, les grandes infrastructures de recherche comme le CERN ont un large impact sur la société grâce à leur capital technologique, économique et humain. Les avancées réalisées en matière d'accélérateurs, de détecteurs et d'informatique ont en effet des répercussions importantes dans des domaines tels que les technologies médicales et biomédicales, les applications aérospatiales, le patrimoine culturel, l'intelligence artificielle, l'énergie, les données massives et la robotique. Les partenariats noués avec de grandes infrastructures de recherche contribuent à stimuler l'innovation dans l'industrie. Du point de vue du capital humain, la formation de scientifiques, d'ingénieurs, de techniciens et de professionnels en début de carrière permet de constituer un vivier de talents pour l'industrie et d'autres secteurs.

La stratégie met également l'accent sur deux autres aspects essentiels : l'environnement et l'importance de la science ouverte. « L’impact environnemental des activités de physique des particules devra continuer d'être étudié de près, et d'être limité autant que possible. Un plan détaillé visant à limiter le plus possible l’impact environnemental et à économiser et réutiliser l'énergie devra faire partie du processus d'approbation de tout projet important », indique l'une des prises de position de la stratégie. Les technologies mises au point en physique des particules dans le but de limiter le plus possible l'impact environnemental des futures installations peuvent également trouver des applications plus générales dans le domaine de la protection de l'environnement.

La mise à jour de la stratégie européenne pour la physique des particules annoncée aujourd'hui a été lancée en septembre 2018, lorsque le Conseil du CERN, composé de représentants des États membres et des États membres associés, a mis sur pied le Groupe sur la stratégie européenne (ESG), chargé de coordonner le processus. Le Groupe sur la stratégie européenne a travaillé en étroite consultation avec la communauté scientifique. Près de deux cents contributions ont été examinées durant le Symposium public de Grenade en mai 2019, et compilées dans le Cahier d'information sur la physique, résumé scientifique des contributions de la communauté, établi par le Groupe préparatoire sur la physique. Le Groupe sur la stratégie européenne est parvenu à une convergence sur les recommandations finales à formuler lors d'une session de rédaction qui s'est déroulée sur une semaine en janvier 2020, en Allemagne. Les résultats de ce travail, présentés au Conseil du CERN en mars, devaient initialement être annoncés le 25 mai à Budapest, mais cette annonce a dû être reportée en raison de la pandémie de COVID-19. Ces résultats ont maintenant été rendus publics.

Pour plus d'informations, consultez les documents de la mise à jour de la stratégie européenne pour la physique des particules :

Mise à jour 2020 de la stratégie européenne pour la physique des particules Document explicatif relatif à la mise à jour 2020 de la stratégie européenne pour la physique des particules

Original version

English

Geneva, 19 June 2020. Today, the CERN Council announced that it had unanimously updated the strategy intended to guide the future of particle physics in Europe within the global landscape (the document is available here). The updated recommendations highlight the scientific impact of particle physics and its technological, societal and human capital. The 2020 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics proposes a vision for both the near- and the long-term future of the field, which maintains Europe's leading role in particle physics and in the innovative technologies developed within the field. The highest-priority physics recommendations are the study of the Higgs boson and the exploration of the high-energy frontier: two crucial and complementary ways to address the open questions in particle physics.

“The Strategy is above all driven by science and thus presents the scientific priorities for the field,” said Ursula Bassler, President of the CERN Council. “The European Strategy Group (ESG) – a special body set up by the Council – successfully led a strategic reflection to which several hundred European physicists contributed.” The scientific vision outlined in the Strategy should serve as a guideline to CERN and facilitate a coherent science policy across Europe.

The successful completion of the High-Luminosity LHC in the coming years, for which upgrade work is currently in progress at CERN, should remain the focal point of European particle physics. The Strategy emphasises the importance of ramping up research and development (R&D) for advanced accelerator, detector and computing technologies as a necessary prerequisite for all future projects. Delivering the near and long-term future research programme envisaged in this Strategy update requires both focused and transformational R&D, which also has many potential benefits to society. The document also highlights the need to pursue an “electron-positron Higgs factory” as the highest-priority facility after the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Construction of this future collider at CERN could start within a timescale of less than 10 years after the full exploitation of the High-Luminosity LHC, which is expected to complete operations in 2038. The electron-positron collider would allow the properties of the Higgs boson to be measured with extremely high precision. The Higgs boson was discovered at CERN in 2012 by scientists working on the LHC, and is expected to be a powerful tool in the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Another significant recommendation of the Strategy is that Europe, in collaboration with the worldwide community, should undertake a feasibility study for a next-generation hadron collider at the highest achievable energy, in preparation for the longer-term scientific goal of exploring the high-energy frontier, with an electron-positron collider as a possible first stage. It is further recommended that Europe continue to support neutrino projects in Japan and the US. Cooperation with neighbouring fields is also important, such as astroparticle and nuclear physics, as well as continued collaboration with non-European countries. “This is a very ambitious strategy, which outlines a bright future for Europe and for CERN with a prudent, step-wise approach. We will continue to invest in strong cooperative programmes between CERN and other research institutes in CERN’s Member States and beyond,” declared CERN Director-General Fabiola Gianotti. “These collaborations are key to sustained scientific and technological progress and bring many societal benefits.” “The natural next step is to explore the feasibility of the high-priority recommendations, while continuing to pursue a diverse programme of high-impact projects,” explains ESG Chair Halina Abramowicz. “Europe should keep the door open to participating in other headline projects that will serve the field as a whole, such as the proposed International Linear Collider project.” Beyond the immediate scientific return, major research infrastructures such as CERN have vast societal impact, thanks to their technological, economic and human capital. Advances in accelerators, detectors and computing have a significant impact on areas like medical and biomedical technologies, aerospace applications, cultural heritage, artificial intelligence, energy, big data and robotics. Partnerships with large research infrastructures help drive innovation in industry.

In terms of human capital, the training of early-career scientists, engineers, technicians and professionals from diverse backgrounds is an essential part of high-energy physics programmes, which provide a talent pool for industry and other fields. The Strategy also highlights two other essential aspects: the environment and the importance of Open Science. “The environmental impact of particle physics activities should continue to be carefully studied and minimised. A detailed plan for the minimisation of environmental impact and for the saving and reuse of energy should be part of the approval process for any major project,” says the report. The technologies developed in particle physics to minimise the environmental impact of future facilities may also find more general applications in environmental protection. The update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics announced today got under way in September 2018 when the CERN Council, comprising representatives from CERN’s Member and Associate Member States, established a European Strategy Group (ESG) to coordinate the process. The ESG worked in close consultation with the scientific community. Nearly two hundred submissions were discussed during an Open Symposium in Granada in May 2019 and distilled into the Physics Briefing Book, a scientific summary of the community’s input, prepared by the Physics Preparatory Group. The ESG converged on the final recommendations during a week-long drafting session held in Germany in January 2020. The group’s findings were presented to the CERN Council in March and were scheduled to be announced on 25 May, in Budapest. This was delayed due to the global Covid-19 situation but they have now been made publicly available.

French

La communauté de la physique des particules met à jour la stratégie guidant l'avenir de la discipline en Europe

Genève, le 19 juin 2020. Aujourd'hui, le Conseil du CERN a annoncé qu'il a mis à jour à l’unanimité la stratégie qui guidera l'avenir de la physique des particules en Europe dans le contexte mondial (le document est disponible ici). Les recommandations mises à jour mettent en évidence l'impact scientifique de la physique des particules ainsi que son capital technologique, sociétal et humain. La mise à jour 2020 de la stratégie européenne pour la physique des particules propose une perspective à court et à long termes de la discipline, maintenant l'Europe à l'avant-garde de la physique des particules et des innovations technologiques développées dans le domaine. Les recommandations scientifiques de priorité absolue sont l'étude du boson de Higgs et l'exploration de la physique à la frontière des hautes énergies, deux voies cruciales et complémentaires pour tenter d’élucider les questions encore irrésolues de la physique des particules.

« La stratégie est avant tout guidée par la science et présente donc les priorités scientifiques de la discipline, a déclaré Ursula Bassler, présidente du Conseil du CERN. Le Groupe sur la stratégie européenne (ESG) – organe spécialement mis en place par le Conseil – a conduit avec succès la réflexion stratégique à laquelle ont contribué plusieurs centaines de scientifiques européens. » La vision scientifique présentée dans la stratégie doit servir de guide au CERN et faciliter la définition d’une politique scientifique cohérente à l'échelle européenne. Mener à bien, au cours de la décennie à venir, la transformation du LHC en machine de haute luminosité, dont les travaux sont en cours au CERN, devrait rester l’axe central de la physique des particules en Europe. La stratégie souligne l'importance d'intensifier les activités de recherche et développement (R&D) sur des technologies d'accélérateur et de détecteur de pointe, ainsi que sur l'infrastructure informatique, en tant que condition préalable à tout futur projet. Elle attire en outre l'attention sur les nombreuses retombées positives potentielles de ces activités de R&D pour la société. Le document souligne aussi la nécessité de réaliser une « usine à Higgs électron-positon » en tant qu'installation prioritaire après le Grand collisionneur de hadrons (LHC). La construction de ce futur collisionneur au CERN pourrait être mis en œuvre dans un délai inférieur à dix ans, après la pleine exploitation du LHC à haute luminosité, qui devrait cesser de fonctionner en 2038. Le collisionneur électron-positon permettrait de mesurer avec une extrême précision les propriétés du boson de Higgs. Découverte au CERN en 2012 par des scientifiques travaillant auprès du LHC, cette particule promet d'être un outil puissant pour rechercher une physique au-delà du Modèle standard. Autre recommandation importante de la stratégie, l'Europe, en collaboration avec la communauté mondiale, devrait entreprendre une étude de faisabilité d'un collisionneur de hadrons de prochaine génération à la plus haute énergie atteignable, en vue d'atteindre l'objectif scientifique fixé à plus long terme, à savoir explorer la physique à la frontière des hautes énergies, au moyen d'un collisionneur électron-positon comme possible première étape. Il est également recommandé que l'Europe continue de soutenir des projets de recherche sur les neutrinos au Japon et aux États-Unis. La coopération avec les disciplines voisines, telles que la physique des astroparticules et la physique nucléaire, est également importante, de même que la poursuite de la collaboration avec les pays non européens. « Il s'agit d'une stratégie très ambitieuse, qui esquisse un avenir brillant pour l'Europe et le CERN selon une approche prudente et progressive. Nous continuerons à investir dans de vigoureux programmes de coopération entre le CERN et d'autres instituts de recherche situés dans les États membres et au-delà, a déclaré la Directrice générale du CERN, Fabiola Gianotti. Ces collaborations sont essentielles à la réalisation de progrès scientifiques et technologiques durables, et génèrent de nombreuses retombées positives pour la société. » « La prochaine étape sera évidemment d'étudier la faisabilité des recommandations de priorité absolue, tout en continuant de mener à bien un programme diversifié de projets susceptibles d'avoir de fortes retombées, a expliqué la Présidente du Groupe sur la stratégie européenne, Halina Abramowicz. L'Europe doit rester disposée à participer à d'autres projets phares qui seront bénéfiques à la discipline dans son ensemble, tels que le projet de Collisionneur linéaire international. » Au-delà d'un retour scientifique immédiat, les grandes infrastructures de recherche comme le CERN ont un impact considérable sur la société grâce à leur capital technologique, économique et humain. Les avancées réalisées en matière d'accélérateurs, de détecteurs et d'informatique peuvent en effet avoir des répercussions importantes dans des domaines tels que les technologies médicales et biomédicales, les applications aérospatiales, le patrimoine culturel, l'intelligence artificielle, l'énergie, les données massives et la robotique. Les partenariats noués avec de grandes infrastructures de recherche contribuent à stimuler l'innovation dans l'industrie. Du point de vue du capital humain, la formation de scientifiques, d'ingénieurs, de techniciens et de professionnels en début de carrière, de différents horizons, est un volet essentiel des programmes de physique des hautes énergies, afin de constituer un vivier de talents pour l'industrie et d'autres secteurs. La stratégie met également l'accent sur deux autres aspects essentiels: l'environnement et l'importance de la Science Ouverte. « L’impact environnemental des activités de physique des particules devra continuer d'être étudié de près et limité autant que possible. Un plan détaillé visant à limiter le plus possible l’impact environnemental et à économiser et réutiliser l'énergie devra faire partie du processus d'approbation de tout projet important », indique l’une des prises de position de la stratégie. Les technologies mises au point en physique des particules dans le but de limiter le plus possible l'impact environnemental des futures installations peuvent également trouver des applications plus générales dans le domaine de la protection de l'environnement.

La mise à jour de la stratégie européenne pour la physique des particules annoncée aujourd'hui a été lancée en septembre 2018, lorsque le Conseil du CERN, composé de représentants des États membres et des États membres associés, a mis sur pied le Groupe sur la stratégie européenne (ESG), chargé de coordonner le processus. Le Groupe sur la stratégie européenne a travaillé en étroite consultation avec la communauté scientifique. Près de deux cents contributions ont été examinées durant le Symposium public de Grenade en mai 2019, et compilées dans le Cahier d'information sur la physique, résumé scientifique des contributions de la communauté, établi par le Groupe préparatoire sur la physique. Le Groupe sur la stratégie européenne est parvenu à une convergence sur les recommandations finales à formuler lors d'une session de rédaction qui s'est déroulée sur une semaine en janvier 2020, en Allemagne. Les résultats de ce travail, présentés au Conseil du CERN en mars, devaient initialement être annoncés le 25 mai, à Budapest, mais cette annonce a dû être reportée en raison de la pandémie de COVID-19. Ces résultats ont maintenant été rendus publics.

-- JohannesGutleber - 2020-06-19

Edit | Attach | Watch | Print version | History: r2 < r1 | Backlinks | Raw View | WYSIWYG | More topic actions
Topic revision: r2 - 2020-06-20 - JohannesGutleber
 
    • Cern Search Icon Cern Search
    • TWiki Search Icon TWiki Search
    • Google Search Icon Google Search

    FCC All webs login

This site is powered by the TWiki collaboration platform Powered by PerlCopyright &© 2008-2023 by the contributing authors. All material on this collaboration platform is the property of the contributing authors.
or Ideas, requests, problems regarding TWiki? use Discourse or Send feedback