Writing Your Own Sandbox.EventView Tools

Setting Up Your Package for Sandbox.EventView

In order to write your own Sandbox.EventView tools, you need a packaged in which to develop your code. See this page in the Computing Workbook to learn how to create your own package. You will need to add the following Sandbox.EventView related lines to your package's requirements file.

use EventViewBuilderUtils   EventViewBuilderUtils-* PhysicsAnalysis/EventViewBuilder

private
macro genconfig_configurableModuleName "EventViewConfiguration.EventViewConfCore.EventViewToolLoopers"
macro genconfig_configurableAlgTool "GenericEventViewTool"
macro genconfig_configurableAlgorithm "EVToolLooperBase"
end_private

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Writing Your Own Event-level Sandbox.EventView Tool (EVTool)

After setting up Athena you should have the command newEVTool in your path. Change directories such that your current working directory is the root of your package (e.g MyPackge/), such that when you list the contents of the directory you get.

cmt/  MyPackage/  src/

Your package should also have a src/components/MyPackage_entires.cxx file.

Then one can call newEVTool by running

>> newEVTool EVMyTool

This command creates skeleton header and source files for your new tool, MyPackage/EVMyTool.h and src/EVMyTool.cxx. It is customary to prefix the name of your EV tools with EV. In the source file, you will see a constructor, a destructor, initialize, finalize, and execute methods, just like any other Athena algorithm. You should use the execute(Sandbox.EventView* ev) method that takes passes a pointer to the current Sandbox.EventView. In the constructor, you should put a declareProperty line for each configurable the user should control from the job options. For example, we will write a tool, EVScaleMET, that scales the missing transverse energy by some factor, configured by the user.

EVScaleMET::EVScaleMET(const std::string& type,
			       const std::string& name,
			       const IInterface* parent):
    EventViewBaseTool(type, name, parent)
{
    declareProperty("ScaleFactor", m_ScaleFactor=1.0);  // double
    declareProperty("MissingEx", m_MissingEx="MET_RefFinal_ex");  // std::string
    declareProperty("MissingEy", m_MissingEy="MET_RefFinal_ey");  // std::string
    declareProperty("MissingEt", m_MissingEt="MET_RefFinal_et");  // std::string
}

Next, you should write any code you want to tool do during initialization and finalization, and what to execute on each event. For this example, we only need to write the execute method. One can use the ev pointer to get access to anything in the current Sandbox.EventView. Here are some examples of the kinds of methods one can use:

  • ev->doubleUserData(a_label); - gets a double with label a_label from UD
  • ev->setDoubleUserData(a_label, a_double); - stores a double with label a_label in UD
  • std::vector<const INavigable4Momentum*>* particles = ev->finalStateObjects(); - gets a vector of pointers to all the final state objects in the Sandbox.EventView.

The Sandbox.EventView class provides several other methods for getting and storing UD, for accessing particles, and for checking a particle's labels. See the Sandbox.EventView class definition for more methods.

For our example, code to get the MET (which needs to have previously been put UD), scale it, and store it in UD, would look like:

StatusCode EVScaleMET::execute(Sandbox.EventView* ev)
{
    double MEx = ev->doubleUserData(m_MissingEx);
    double MEy = ev->doubleUserData(m_MissingEy);
    double MEt = ev->doubleUserData(m_MissingEt);

    double MEx_scaled = MEx*m_ScaleFactor;
    double MEy_scaled = MEy*m_ScaleFactor;
    double MEt_scaled = std::sqrt(MEx_scaled*MEx_scaled + MEy_scaled*MEy_scaled);

    CheckSC(ev->setDoubleUserData(m_MissingEx + "_scaled", MEx_scaled));
    CheckSC(ev->setDoubleUserData(m_MissingEy + "_scaled", MEy_scaled));
    CheckSC(ev->setDoubleUserData(m_MissingEt + "_scaled", MEt_scaled));

    return StatusCode::SUCCESS;
}

Note that you will have to #include <cmath> to use std::sqrt.

Then, after you have declared the tool's private data like m_ScaleFactor in the header file, you are ready to compile by going to the package's cmt directory and running gmake. Compiling will automatically create the necessary python code to so that your tool can be imported and configured in job options. Tools created with newEVTool should be scheduled to an EVMultipleOutputToolLooper to be run event-by-event, if you want to create a tool to run within a tool looper over particles, you should create EVUDObjTool, described in the next section.

To schedule and configure your tool in your python job options, you should do something like:

from MyPackage.MyPackageConf import EVScaleMET
theEVMOToolLooper += EVScaleMET('theEVScaleMET', ScaleFactor=1.2)

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Writing Your Own Particle-level Sandbox.EventView Tool (EVUDObjTool)

An EVUDObjTool is a tool to be run on each of some set of particles in an event, usually to calculate some UD for each of those particles. It should be scheduled to a looper like an EVUDFinalStateLooper that loops over the particles for the tool to run on.

For example, we will write a tool called EVUDTransMassCalculator, that calculates the transverse mass between a given particle and the missing transverse energy. In our python job options, we can configure this tool to calculated the transverse mass for every particle with the label 'Muon' by writing the following.

FSLooper = EVUDFinalStateLooper('MuonFSLooper',
        Labels = ['Muon'],
        Prefix = 'Muon_',
        OutputLevel = WARNING)
FSLooper += EVUDTransMassCalculator('TransMassCalc',
        MissingEt = 'MET_RefFinal_et',
        MissingEx = 'MET_RefFinal_ex',
        MissingEy = 'MET_RefFinal_ey')
theEVMOToolLooper += FSLooper

Similar to the discussion in the above section, in the root directory of the package in which you will develop your tool, you can use the newEVUDObjTool command to create skeleton header and source files.

>> newEVUDObjTool EVUDTransMassCalculator INavigable4Momentum

The second argument is the type of particle looped over by the EVUDFinalStateLooper, to which EVUDTransMassCalculator will be scheduled. We use INavigable4Momentum to make this tool's application general. Every EDM particle type inherits from INavigable4Momentum. Unless your tool will use something specific to a particle type's EDM, you should write the tool for use with INavigable4Momentum.

EVUDObjTools have two execute methods, executeObj and executeDummy. The executeObj method is the code to be run particle-by-particle for each particle looped over by the final state looper. The executeObj method passes const INavigable4Momentum *part parameter that points to the particle currently being considered by the final state looper to which this EVUDObjTool was scheduled. The ev pointer parameter is for setting/accessing event-level UD and accessing particles inserted to the current Sandbox.EventView. The UD pointer parameter is for setting/accessing the particle-level UD of part.

The executeDummy is for filling dummy values to UD when the final state looper didn't have a particle to loop over, but needs a dummy value such that data can be aggregated when dumping UD to a ROOT TTree.

EVUDTransMassCalculator::EVUDTransMassCalculator(const std::string& type,
			       const std::string& name,
			       const IInterface* parent):
  EVUDObjCalcBaseT<INavigable4Momentum>(type, name, parent)
{ 
    declareProperty("MissingEx", m_MissingEx="MET_RefFinal_ex");  // std::string
    declareProperty("MissingEy", m_MissingEy="MET_RefFinal_ey");  // std::string
    declareProperty("MissingEt", m_MissingEt="MET_RefFinal_et");  // std::string
}

EVUDTransMassCalculator::~EVUDTransMassCalculator() 
{ }

StatusCode EVUDTransMassCalculator::executeObj(Sandbox.EventView* ev, UserDataBlock *UD, const INavigable4Momentum *part, 
				std::string prefix, std::string postfix)
{
    double MEx = ev->doubleUserData(m_MissingEx);
    double MEy = ev->doubleUserData(m_MissingEy);
    double MEt = ev->doubleUserData(m_MissingEt);

    double NuPhi = atan2(MEy, MEx);

    double TMass = sqrt(2.*( part->et() * MEt ) * ( 1.-cos(NuPhi-part->phi()) ));

    CheckSC(UD->put<double>(prefix+"TransM"+postfix,TMass));

    return StatusCode::SUCCESS;
}

StatusCode EVUDTransMassCalculator::executeDummy(Sandbox.EventView* ev, UserDataBlock *UD, 
				std::string prefix, std::string postfix)
{
    CheckSC(UD->put<double>(prefix+"TransM"+postfix,0.));
    return StatusCode::SUCCESS;
}

As with the EVTool example, after you have declared the tool's private data like m_MissingEx in the header file, you are ready to compile by going to the package's cmt directory and running gmake. Compiling will automatically create the necessary python code to so that your tool can be imported and configured in job options.

A job that uses this EVUDTransMassCalculator tool and later uses AANtupleFromUserData to dump the UD to a ntuple will create an ntuple with a variable called Muon_TransM for every particle inserted into the EV with the label 'Muon'.

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-- RyanReece - 07 Oct 2008

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Topic revision: r7 - 2020-08-19 - TWikiAdminUser
 
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